Notes

[NI0001] THE MARRIAGE OF THE FIRST MATHEW, VIZ, MATHEW AP EVAN, TO JANET FLEMING, WHO WAS WHAT WE PRESUME WOULD NOW BE STYLED A "LADY IN HER OWN RIGHT", BEING THE DAU. AND SOLE HEIRESS OF ONE OF THE GREAT FEUDAL BARONS OF GLAMORGAN, GAVE THE STATUS OF BARONS OF GLAMORGAN TO THE ELDEST LINE OF THE MATHEW CLAN FOR FOUR GENERATIONS. JENKIN FLEMING AT THE TIME OF HIS DAUGHTER'S MARRIAGE SEEMS TO HAVE RESIDED IN LLANDAFF, AND HER HUSBAND, MATHEW AP EVAN, WAS PROBABLY THE FIRST OF HIS FAMILY WHO REALLY DWELT WITHIN THE LITTLE CITY, FROM WHICH THE ANCIENT FAMILY SEAT OF CASTELL-Y-MYNACH WAS FIVE MILES DISTANT.

[NI0003] BURIED AT ST. MARY'S, LLANDAFF, GLAMORGAN, WALES.
KILLED IN 1484 AT ROIT.
GGGG-SON OF LOUIS VI OF FRANCE.
FAMILY LINE: OF LLANDAFF COURT; RADYR; DODBROKE CO. DEVON AND OF TEESENGER AND PENNYTENNY CO. CORNWALL.
OWNED 2,232 ACRES OF LAND FROM HENRY VI IN ST. FAGAN'S AND PENTYRCH, WALES.
SIR DAVID MATHEW (SIR MATHEW AP IEVAN) B. 1400, D. 1484, M.
WENLLIAN, DAU. OF SIR GEORGE HERBERT. SIR DAVID MATHEW WAS ONE OF THE MOST DISTINGUISHED MEN OF HIS AGE, AND WAS MADE GRAND STANDARD BEARER OF ENGLAND BY KING EDWARD IV, WHOSE LIFE HE IS SAID TO HAVE SAVED (THOUGH HE WAS FAR ADVANCED IN YEARS) AT THE BATTLE OF TOWTON, ON PALM SUNDAY, 1461. HIS TOMB, ORNAMENTED WITH HIS FULL-LENGTH FIGURE IN ALABASTER, IN ST. MARY'S CHAPEL, OF THE VENERABLE CATHEDRAL OF LLANDAFF, (WHICH HAS EVER SINCE BEEN THE PROPERTY AND BURIAL-PLACE OF THE FAMILY OF MATHEW) IS ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING EXTANT MONUMENTS OF THAT TIME. AN ACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF THE VARIOUS MONUMENTS OF THE FAMILY IN THIS CHAPEL MAY BE FOUND IN WILLIS'S CATHEDRAL OF LLANDAFF, IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM..) SIR DAVID "WAS SLAIN BY THE TURBERVILLES IN A RIOT AT NEATH. HE HAD A GRANT OF 2,232 ACRES OF LAND FROM HENRY VI., THE REVERSION OF CANETON, AND FROM WILLIAM EARL OF PEMBROKE LANDS AT ST. FAGAN'S AND IN PENTYRCH. BURIED AND HAS A FINE ALTAR TOMB AT LLANDAFF. HE M. WENLLIAN, DAU. OF GEORGE HERBERT OF CHAPEL, SISTER TO GWILIM LLWYD, WHO M. WENLLIAN DAVID OF RHIWPERRA." THE GENEALOGY OF THE EARLS OF LLANDAFF (NOTE-- I HAVE NO IDEA WHY, IN THIS BOOK, THE TITLE IS SPELLED THUS: "LANDAFF" AS WELL AS ANY MENTIONS OF THE EARLDOM OF LANDAFF, WHILE IN THE TEXT, MENTIONS OF THE CATHEDRAL OF LLANDAFF, AS WELL AS OTHER REFERENCES TO LLANDAFF AS A PLACE IN WALES, INVARIABLY SPELL IT "LLANDAFF"), WHICH HAS A PICTURE OF THE TOMB OF SIR DAVID, HAS THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT HIM: "SIR DAVID AB MATHEW, LORD OF LLANDAFF, SENESCHAL OF THE CATHEDRAL, SAVED THE LIFE OF EDWARD IV, AT THE BATTLE OF TOWTON,PALM SUNDAN, 14 MARCH., 1461, AND BY HIS MAJESTY WAS CREATED GRAND STANDARD-BEARER OF ALL ENGLAND. HE WAS A GREAT AND ZEALOUS YORKIST CHIEFTAIN, WHOSE EXTRAORDINARY PROWESS AND DARING IN THE FIELD, EVEN AT A VERY ADVANCED AGE, WERE, CONTRARILY TO THE MAJORITY OF HIS COUNTRYMENT, WHO FAVOURED THE RED ROSE OF LANCASTER, USED ON BEHALF OF THE WHITE ROSE OF YORK. HE WAS MURDERED BY ONE OF THE TURBERVILLES IN A RIOT AT NEATH, 1484, AND BURIED IN LLANDAFF CATHEDRAL, WHERE HIS ALTAR TOMB MAY STILL BE SEEN, EFFIGY OF HIM THEREON MEASURING 6 FT. 7IN., SAID TO HAVE BEEN HIS HEIGHT. SIR DAVID WAS ONE OF THE TEN GREAT BARONS OF GLAMORGAN, AND A MARCHER LORD. HE RECEIVED FROM EDWARD IV, THE GRANT OF THE USE OF THE WORD "TOWTON" AS AN AUGMENTATION OVER HIS CREST. IN 1480 HE RESTORED THE SHRINE OF ST. TEILO WHICH HAD BEEN PILLAGED AND DESECRATED BY A GANG OF PIRATES FROM BRISTOL, AND WAS PRESENTED BY BISHOP MARSHALL WITH ST. TEILO'S SKULL, SET IN A COSTLY RELIQUARY, TO BE AN HEIRLOOM IN HIS FAMILY, WHO CAREFULLY PRESERVED IT FOR ABOUT 200 YEARS, UNTIL THE DEATH OF WILLIAM MATHEW IN 1658 AT LLANDEILO. SIR DAVID WAS THE FIRST TO ADOPT THE SURNAME OF MATHEW. THE NAME, PROPERLY "MATHEW", WAS SPELT BY SIR DAVID'S DESCENDANTS VARIOUSLY, E.G. IN THE FUNERAL ENTRIES, PRESERVED IN THE RECORD TOWER AT DUBLIN, VOL. VII., P. 18, THE NAME OF THE FOUNDER OF THE IRISH BRANCH OF THE FAMILY IS ENTERED AS "GEORGE MATTHEWES, OCT. 1670." ADMIRAL MATHEW OF LLANDAFF COURT, AND ALL HIS DESCENDANTS, SPELT THEIR NAME INVARIABLY "MATHEWS." HE M. GWENDOLINE, D. OF SIR DAVID HERBERT OF CHAPEL, MONMOUTH, 2ND S. OF WILLIAM AP JENKYN, ANCESTOR OF THE EARLS OF PEMBROKE. ARMS OF SIR DAVID MATHEW -- STABLE, A LION RAMPANT ARGENT (ADOPTED IN HONOUR OF THE WHITE ROSE). CREST- A BLACKCOCK PROPER. MOTTO-- FYN DUW A FYDD.: TRANSLATION OF MOTTO: WHAT GOD WILLETH WILL BE. WAS THE FIRST LORD OF CARDIGANSHIRE, WALES AND WAS THE GREAT GREAT GREAT GRANDSON OF OUIS VI OF FRANCE AND THE NINTH GENERATION DESCENDED FROM GOLLHERD OF WALES. HIS TOMBSTONE IS STILL EXTANT AT CARDIGANSHIRE WALES (675).
Info. on the Manor of Llandaff: Near the castle stands the ancient mansion of the family of Mathew of Llandaff. It was formerly called Bryn-y-gynen, but now Llandaff Court, and is supposed to have been built by David Mathew ap Ieuan Gruffydd Gethin (Rick Merrick). It was rebuilt in the 18th century and is now the palace of the Bishop of Llandaff.

[NI0004] ROBERT MATHEW (SIR MATHEW AP IEVAN) "OF CASTELL-Y-MYNACH IN PENTYRCH, SECOND SON OF SIR MATTHEW AP EVAN OF LLANDAFF BY JENET FLEMING; M. ALICE, D. AND CO-H. OF JENKIN THOMAS AP EVAN DAVID OF PANT-Y-CORRED AP L1. YCHAN AP L1. AP CYNFRIG, LORD OF LLANTRITHYD, AP HOWEL AP MADOC, LORD OF RUTHYN, AP JESTYN. SHE WAS THE HEIR OF CASTELL-Y-MYNACH." THE LINEAGE OF ALICE, WIFE OF ROBERET MATHEW, IS THE SAME (TO A POINT) AS THAT OF CECIL, WIFE OF SIR IEVAN. BRIEFLY, TO THE POINT OF DIVERGANCE, IT IS THUS: I. GWRGAN, LORD OF GLAMORGAN; HAD II. JESTYN AP GWRGAN, WHO HAD III. MADOC, LORD OF RUTHYN WHO HAD ISSUE; IV, HOWEL, WHO HAD V. CYNFRIG, LORD OF LLANTRITHYD AND RADYR, WHO HAD VI. LLEWELYN OF LLANTRIGHYD, WHO HAD VII. LLEWELYN-YCHAN, SECOND SON OF LLEWELYN AP CYNFRIG, WAS LORD OF MISCIN. HE M. CATHERINE, D. OF HOPKIN AP HOWEL-VACHAN, OF CO. BRECON. ISSUE: 1. DAVID ...VII. DAVID OF MISCIN, M. CATHERINE D. AND H. OF JEVAN GOCH OF RHYDLAVAR, AND HAD: IX. JEVAN, CONSTABLE OF MISCIN, M. MARGARET, D. OF JENKIN KEMEYS OF BEGAN...X. THOMAS PF PENCOED, M. 1ST A D. OF REES JENKIN, 2ND A D. OF HOWEL GIBBON OF CEFN-TRE-PAYN. BY THE 1ST HE HAD: XI. JENKIN OF PEN-COED, M. JENET, D. OF PHILIP THOMAS GWILIM HERBERT. ISSUE: XII. ALICE, D. AND CO-H, M. ROBERT MATHEW.

INFO. ONLY: ROBERT MATHEW MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE EXISTED. FROM THE FOLLOWING SOURCE, WHICH IS THE ONLY ONE IN WHICH I HAVE FOUND SIR DAVID MATHEW LISTED AS HAVING HAD A SON, ROBERT, IT APPEARS THAT THE REFERENCE IN QUESTION HAS MIXED UP ROBERT MATHEW, BROTHER OF SIR DAVID MATHEW WITH A POSSIBLE SON OF SIR DAVID'S NAMED ROBERT: "ROBERT MATHEW, OF CASTLE MENYCH, WHO M. MAUDE, DAU. OF THOMAS AP HOWELL, LORD OF BRECKNOCK. HIS IMMEDIATE DESCENDANT, THOMAS (M.P. CO. GLAMORGAN) APPEARS IN PETER LE NEVE'S MMS., TOGETHER WITH DAVID MATHEW OF LLANDAFF, AS ONE OF THE KNIGHTS OF THE PROPOSED ORDER OF THE ROYAL OAK, IN 1661; CECIL, DAU. AND HEIR TO HIS GRANDSON, CHARLES MATHEWS, OF HENSON AND CASTLE MEYNCH (BY CECIL, ONLY DAU. AND HEIR TO THE CELEBRATED LOYALIST, JUDGE JENKYNS) M. CHARLES TALBOT, LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND, (GREAT-GRANDFATHER TO THE PRESENT EARL TALBOT) WHO WAS CREATED, IN 1733 BARON TALBOT, OF HENSON CO. GLAMORGAN, YOUNGER SONS OF THIS BRNACH BECAME SEATED AT UPTON GREY AND ALTON CO. HANTS, AND AT STANSTED PARK, CO. SUSSEX. OF THIS LATTER LINE, HENRY M. ANNE, DAU. AND HEIR OF THE HON. STANISLAUS BROWNE, BROTHER TO VISCOUNT MONTAGU; AND HIS SON, FRANCIS, ABOUT THE YER 1755, SETTLED IN SPAIN, WHERE HE LEFT A NUMEROUS ISSUE. THE GREAT-GRANDSON OF MAURICE MATHEW, OF ROOS, SECOND SON OF ROBERT, OF CASTLE MENYCH, TOBIAS MATHEW, LORD ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, RANKS DESERVEDLY AMONG THE MOST EMINENT ENGLISH PRELATES. HIS GRACE D. 29 MARCH 1628, AND HIS SON SIR TOBY MATHEW, M.P. FOR ST. ALBANS, D. UNM. IN 1655. THE FOREGOING, THOUGH IT APPEARS TO BE SOMEWHAT MIXED UP, IS GIVEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

[NI0008] RIMRON MATHEW (OR REINBORN OR BUMBRIAN) . WILL DATED 1470. BURIED AT GAUNTS NEAR BRISTOL, M. ELIZABETH D. OF SIR MAURICE DENYS OF ASTERTON CO. GLOUC. 1. RUMBRIAN, CALLED ALSO REINBORN AND RIMRON, FOUNDER OF THE LLANDAFF BRANCH; OB. 1470, SEPT. IN ST. MARK'S - THE MAYOR'S CHAPEL-BRISTOL, IN ACCORDANCE WITH HIS WILL, BY WHICH HE ALSO DIRECTED THAT GOLDEN AND SILVER ORNAMENTS SHOULD BE PLACED UPON THE SHRINE OF HIS KINSMEN ST. TEILO, ST. ODOCEUS, AND ST. DUBRITIUS, IN LLANDAFF CATHEDRAL. HE M. ISABEL, D. OF SIR MORRIS DENIS OF ASTERTON, GLOUCESTER...2. REINBORN, LORD OF LLANDAFF, WHO M. ELIZA, DAU. OF SIR MAURICE DENYS, KNT. OF ASTERTON, CO. GLOUCESTER, AND HIS DESCENDANTS CONTINUED AT LLANDAFF, UNTIL THE DECEASE S.P. (WITHOUT ISSUE) AT BATH, IN 1820 OF THOMAS MATHEWS, ESQ. OF LLANDAFF COURT (ONLY SON OF THE ILL-USED BUT GALLANT ADMIRAL MATHEWS, M.P. (MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT) FOR THE CO. OF GLAMORGAN.
Reynborn, esq. Mathewe will Cardiff Records, Vo. III, Ch. V.
will dated 1470 says of Mavelma (Gabalfa?); to be buried; listed in will is: Father David; Isabella, wife; Thomas, esq. deceased brother; John Boteler, esq, cousin;

[NI0009] JENKYN MATHEW WHO WAS KILLED AT COWBRIDGE BY THE MEN OF BRECKNOCK. THERE SEEMS TO BE SOME CONTENTION AMONG THE VARIOUS AUTHORITIES OVER WHETHER OR NOT THIS JENKYN MATHEW LEFT ISSUE. HIS DESCENDANTS SETTLED IN DEVON AND CORNWALL.

[NI0010] Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V. dated 1504 David Mathew, esq. of Totworth, Gloucestershire; Listed in will: Morgan Mathew, son of Morgan Mathew; William Mathew, brother; John Boteler, executor; Philip Gibbon; Lewis ap Llewylen;

[NI0011] WILLIAM MATHEW M. LLECCI. D. OF GRIFF AP NICHOLAS. WILLIAM CALLED VAWR, ON ACCOUNT OF HIS GIGANTIC STATURE.

[NI0012] From "The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" by George T. Clark states:
The following from the close roll relates to this marriage: "Bond between David Mathew, of Landaff, Esq. and John Mathew, of Landaff, his son, to Roger Fenys and Thomas Gresley, Knights, for 40 pounds to be paid on the Purification of the Virgin next coming."

"Indunture between Roger Fenys, Kt. Treasurer of the King's Household, on one part, and David Mathew of Landaff and John Mathew his son, on the other, witnesseth that Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, by his letters patent 17 Sept.. 18 H. VI. for 100 pounds granted to Roger Fenys custody of all the lands and tenements of Thomas Malefaunt, Kt., held of the said Duke, in the county of Pembroke, on the day he died, and the custody and marriage of Edmund, son and heir of Thomas. Also Roger Fenys grants unto David Mathew and John Mathew the said custody and marriages for 240 marcs, they finding fitting sustenance for Edmund, and sustaining buildings, etc. Also, Edmund Malefaunt is to marry Katherine, dau. of Mathew. Also if Katherine die without heir by Edmund, or before Edmund be 21 years old, then David is to refund 210 marcs. Dated, May 19, Henry VI."

[NI0014] THOMAS MATHEW OF RADYR DIED 1470, BURIED AT MARK'S, GUANTS, NEAR BRISTOL; HE WAS FOURTH SON OF SIR DAVID MATHEW OF LLANDAFF; M. CATHERINE DAU. AND CO-H. OF SIR DAVID L1 AP EVAN-GETHYN, LORD OF THE ADWR, AP L1 OF RADYR UCHA, AP CYMER AP CYNFRIG AP HOWEL AP MADOC AP JESTYN BY EVA, DAU. OF GWILIM AP EVAN AP LYSON. THOMAS IS ALSO GIVEN AS FOUNDER OF THE RADYR BRANCH; M. CATHERINE. D. AND CO-H. OF MORGAN LLEN, LORD OF ALDER, WHOSE MARRIAGE PORTION WAS THE RADYR ESTATE. HE OB. 1470. HE SUCCEEDED HIS FATHER AS CUSTODIAN OF THE RELIC OF ST. TEILO.
ARMS OF THOMAS MATHEW - OR, A LION RAMPANY SABLE, LANGUED AND ARMED GULES. CREST - HEATHCOCK, SABLE.
Will dated 1470; Cardiff records, vol. III, chapter V. Will no. 1; Thomas Mathewe, Esq. of Radyr; to be buried at Gaunts. Listed in will: David Mathewe, eldest son; John Mathewe, son; Katherine, wife;

[NI0015] MARRIED EDMUND MALEFAUNT OF UPTON CASTLE. THE FOLLOWING FROM THE CLOSE ROLL RELATES TO THIS MARRIAGE: BOND BETWEEN DAVID MATHEW, OF LLANDAFF ESQ. AND JOHN MATHEW, OF LLANDAFF, HIS SON, TO ROGER FENYS AND THOMAS GRESLEY, KNIGHTS, FOR 40 POUNDS TO BE PAID ON THE PURIFICATION OF THE VIRGIN NEXT COMING. INDENTURE BETWEEN ROGER FENYS, KT., TREASURER OF THE KINGS HOUSEHOLD, ON ONE PART, AND DAVID MATHEW OF LLANDAFF AND JOHN MATHEW HIS SON, ON THE OTHER, WITNESSETH THAT HUMPHREY DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, BY HIS LETTERS PATENT 17 SEPT. 18 H. VI. FOR 100 POUNDS, GRANTED TO ROGER FENYS CUSTODY OF ALL THE LANDS AND TENEMENTS OF THOMAS MALEFAUNT, KT., HELD OF THE SAID DUKE, IN THE COUNTY OF PEMBROKE, ON THE DAY HE DIED, AND THE CUSTODY AND MARRIAGE OF EDMUND, SON AND HEIR OF THOMAS. ALSO ROGER FENYS GRANTS UNTO DAVID MATHEW AND JOHN MATHEW THE SAID CUSTODY AND MARRIAGE FOR 240 MARCS, THEY FINDING FITTING SUSTENANCE FOR EDMUND, AND SUSTAINING BUILDINGS, ETC., ALSO IF KATHERINE DIE WITHOUT HEIR BY EDMUND, OR BEFORE EDMUND BE 21 YEARS OLD, THEN DAVID IS TO REFUND 210 MARCS. DATED MAY 19, HENRY IV.

[NI0022] CHRISTOPHER MATHEW RESIDED AT GLAMORGANSHIRE, WALES, WHERE HE DIED IN 1550, AND IS BURIED IN THE CATHEDRAL AT LLANDAFF. HE MARRIED ELIZABETH, DAUGHTER AND HEIR OF WILLIAM, SECOND SON OF JENKIN PHILIP. SHE DIED 30 JAN. 1500. ANOTHER SOURCE, WHICH GIVES THE INSCRIPTION ON THE ALTAR-TOMB OF SIR CHRISTOPHER AND ELIZABETH MATHEW, GIVES HER DATE OF DETH DIFFENTLY: SIR CHRISTOPHER MATHEW, WHOSE ALTAR-TOMB, WITH EFFIGIES OF HIS WIFE AND HIMSELF, IS IN LLANDAFF CATHEDRAL. IT BEARS THE FOLLOWING INSCRIPTION: ORATE PRO ANIMABUS XPOFERI MATHEW, ARMIGERI, ET ELIZABETH, WXORIS EJUS, QUI QUIDEM ELIZABETH OBIIT PENULTIMA DIE JANUARII A.D. 1526, AT PRAEDICTUS XOPFERUS OBIIT DIE A.D. 1550 QUORUM ANIMABUS PROPITIETUR DEUS. AMEN. THE FOREGOING SOURCE ALSO CONTAINS A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE TOMB. SOME REFERENCES STATE THAT SIR CHRISTOPHER MARRIED 2ND MARGARET TUCKER, BUT HIS CHILDREN BY HERE WERE EVIDENTLY OF BASE ISSUE. ISSUE OF SIR CHRISTOPHER MATHEW AND ELIZABETH PHILIP.

[NI0027] HARRY MATHEW AP WILLIAM AP DAVID AP MATHEW OF LLANISHEN, 1577, M. CATHERINE, DAUGHTER OF EVAN THOMAS JENKIN HERBERT.

[NI0030] SIR WILLIAM MATHEW AP THOMAS AP DAVID AP MATHEW OF RADYR, WAS KNIGHTED BY KING HENRY VII, UNDER THE BANNER OF ENGLAND, ON THE FIELD OF BOSWORTH, 22 AUGUST 1485. HE MARRIED JANET, DAUGHTER AND HEIR OF HARRY-AB-GLYN THOMAS VAUGHAN, LORD OF LANLAIS AND COURT. HE ACCOMPANIED HENRY VIII TO THE FIELD OF THE CLOTH OF GOLD. RESTORED THE EPISCOPAL PALACE AT LLANDAFF, WHICH HAD BEEN DESTROYED BY OWEN GLENDWR. (IT WAS AGAIN SHATTERED BY THE CROMWELLIAN TROOPS IN 1646). SIR WILLIAM DIED 10 MARCH 1528. HIS FINE ALTAR-TOMB WITH EFFIGIES OF HIMSELF AND HIS WIFE, WERE WROUGHT BY CELLINI IN ITALY, AND STAND TO THE NORTH-EAST OF THE NAVE. THE INSCRIPTION IS AS FOLLOWS: ORATE PRO ANIMABUS GULIELMI MATHEW, MILITIS, QUI OBIT DECIMA DIE MARTII, A.D. 1528, ETIAM JEONETTAE UXORIS EJUS, QUAE DEO REDIDIT SPIRITUM-DIE-MEUSIS, A.D. 1530 QUORUM ANIMABUS PROPITIETUR DEUS. AMEN. SIR WILLIAM WAS CUSTODIAN OF ST. TEILO'S RELIC. OTHER SOURCES ARE IN SUBSTANTIAL AGREEMENT WITH THE FOREGOING ACCOUNT OF SIR WILLIAM WITH SLIGHT VARIATIONS: KNIGHTED ON BOSWORTH FIELD BY THE EARL OF RICHMOND, 1485..M.JENET, D. AND CO-H OF HENRY OF LLANGATHEN, AP GWILLIM AP THOMAS-VECHAN AP THOMAS AP DAVID AP GRIFFITH AP GRONO GOCH FROM ELYSTAN GLODDRYD. SHE DIED 1500.
"MATHEW OF RADIR"
THE SAME IN DESCENT WITH THE FOREGOING EDMUND MATHEW AND BRANCHING OFF FROM LLANDAFF WITH THOMAS, THIRD SON OF DAVID, WHO HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS FIRST SETTLING THE SURNAME OF MATHEW. THOMAS MARRIED CATE, DAU. AND CO HEIR OF MORGAN LLEWELYN AP IVAN. THEIR ELDEST SON WAS WILLIAM, WHO BECAME SIR WILLIAM MATHEW, KT., OF RADIR. HE WAS SUCCEEDED BY HIS SON SIR GEORGE MATHEW, KT. THIS FAMILY SUPPLIED SEVERAL SHERIFFS FOR THE CO. OF GLAMORGAN; EX. GR., WILLIAM MATHEW, 1567, DO., 1579; HENRY MATHEW, 1589; THOMAS MATHEW 1613."

[NI0038] JANET MATHEW AP THOMAS AP DAVID AP MATHEW DIED IN 1485. SHE MARRIED BOTH SIR RHYS AP THOMAS, AND SIR THOMAS STRADLING OF ST. DONAT'S CASTLE, ALTHOUGH IN WHAT ORDER IS NOT CERTAIN - THE BOOKS CONSULTED ARE IN CONFLICT ON THIS POINT. HER DATE OF DEATH IS ALSO GIVEN AS 1535. SIR THOMAS STRADLING DIED 8 SEPT. 1480, AND WAS THE SON OF SIR HENRY STRADLING, OF ST. DONAT'S, AND ELIZABETH HERBERT, DAUGHTER OF SIR WILLIAM AP THOMAS. JANET MATHEW, ALSO GIVEN AS JENET, WAS THE ANCESTOR OF MARY/FRANCIS HINTON, WHO MARRIED SAMUEL MATHEWS, COLONIAL GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA.

[NI0059] WILLIAM MATHEW AP WILLIAM AP ROBERT AP MATHEW MARRIED 1ST ELIZABETH DAU. AND HEIR OF JEVAN OR JENKIN MORGAN OF LLANTRYTHID; SHE HAD TAL-Y-GARN LORDSHIP AND THE HOUSE AND LANDS IN LLANTRYTHID; HE MARRIED 2ND AGNES OR ANN, DAU. OF LLEWELYN AP EVAN LEWIS OF RHYDLAVAR.

[NI0068] ROBERT MATHEW AP MORGAN AP ROBERT AP MATHEW OF RHIW-Y-SAWSON MARRIED MARGERY DAU. OF JENKIN AP HOWEL GIBBON.

[NI0077] SIR TOBIAS MATHEW, JR. BORN OCT 3, 1577 AT SALISBURY, ENGLAND DIED OCT 13, 1655 AT ENGLISH COLLEGE, GHENT. HE WAS A COURTIER AND DIPLOMAT AND BECAME A ROMAN CATHOLIC IN FLORENCE IN 1606. HE WAS SENT TO MADRID AS ADVISOR TO PRINCE CHARLES AND BUCKINGHAM, 1623 AND WAS SECRETARY TO STAFFORD IN IRELAND, IN 1633. HE WAS LATER SUSPECTED BY THE PURITANS OF BEING A PAPAL SPY AND DRIVEN ABROAD IN 1640. HE WAS A FRIEND OF FRANCIS BACON, WHOSE ESSAYS HE TRANSLATED INTO ITALIAN IN 1618. BACON'S ESSAYS OF FRIENDSHIP WERE WRITTEN FOR TOBIAS, JR.

[NI0080] GOVERNOR SAMUEL MATHEWS WAS BORN IN ENGLAND, PROBABLY IN 1592, AND DIED IN VIRGINIA 13 MARCH 1659/60. HE MARRIED LADY FRANCES HINTON, DAU. OF SIR THOMAS HINTON AND CATHERINE PALMER, HERSELF A MATHEW DESCENDANT. SAMUEL MATHEWS CAME TO AMERICA IN 1622 IN THE SOUTHAMPTON. CAPT. SAMUEL MATHEWS PRINCIPAL LAND HOLDINGS MAY BE IDENTIFIED IN FOUR PATENTS:

[NI0144] MILES MATHEW AP CHRISTOPHER AP RIMRON AP DAVID OF LLANDAFF, "SHERIFF 1547" MARRIED 1ST JOAN, DAU. OF JOHN MORGAN OF TREDEGAR; 2ND, MARGARET, DAU. OF ROBERT GAMAGE OF COYTY CASTLE; SHE MARRIED 2ND THOMAS LEWIS OF VAN, AND 3RD CAPT. HERBERT OF CARDIFF. MILES DIED 14 NOVEMBER 1557, INQ. P.M. 4 P. & M.

[NI0147] LEWIS MATHEW AP CHRISTOPHER AP RIMRON AP DAVID AP MATHEW OF TIR-Y-GOLD OR GOLDSLAND NEAR WENVOE, BASE SON OF CHRISTOPHER OF LLANDAFF, 1547, BY MARGARET TUCKER. HE M. MARGARET DAU. OF THOMAS TRACEY OF WENVOE.

[NI0155] ROBERT MATHEW AP WILLIAM AP ROBERT AP MATHEW OF CASTELL-Y-MYNACH, SAID BY LELAND TO BE LIVING IN 1535; IF SO, AT A GREAT AGE. HE MARRIED ALICE, DAU. & HEIR OF JOHN THOMAS AP THOMAS OF PANT-Y-CORRED (MISCIN AND MOUNTON), AP EVAN AP DAVID AP L1. YCHAN, FROM MADOC AP JESTYN. ROBERT IS ALSO CALLED OF PENCOED AND LLANTRITHYD. ALICE HAD PANT-Y-CORRED, PANT-LLECH, COED-PHILIP-FRANC, BRYN-RHYDD, AND LANDS IN LLANTWIT-VARDRE.

[NI0158] THOMAS MATHEW AP ROBERT AP WILLIAM AP ROBERT AP MATHEW OF MAES-MAWR, IN LLANTWIT-VARDRE. "THIRD SON OF ROBERT MATHEW OF CASTELL-Y-MYNACH, BY ALICE OF PANT-Y-CORRED, WHOSE LANDS IN LLANTWIT-VARDRE HE INHERITED; MARRIED 1ST CATHERINE, DAU. OF LEWIS LLEWELYN AP EVAN AP DAVID OF RYDLAVAR; 2ND MARY, DAU. OF JOHN STRADLING OF GELLIGAER, CLERK.

[NI0160] TOOK OVER GRANFATHERS KNIGHTS OF ST. JOHNS IN 1288 KNOWN AS JEVAN'S HOSPICE.
9TH LORD OF GROSMONT, M.A. ORIEL COLLEGE, OXFORD.
Of Brynwith, 9th Lord of Grosmont; M.A. Oriel College, Oxford; married Cecilia, dau. and heir of Sir Robert de Clare, 2nd son of Richard 4th Earl of Hereford, by his wife the Lady Amina, dau. and co-heir with her sister Isabel (1st wife of King John) to William, Earl of Gloucester.

[NI0166] Knight of the Holy Sepulchre, an eminent leader of the Crusaders, who founded the Hospice of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, which was afterwards endowed by his grandson Jevan in 1288, and known as Jevan's Hospice. Sir Madock married Gwendoline, dau. of Griffith Goeg.

[NI0182] Lord of Gwent; who had issue Mervick, Lord of Gwent; who had issue Morvydd, d. and h., who m. Gronoe ab Ednivet Vaughan, Baron of Brynvengle, Cheif Counsellor to Llewellyn ab Iowerth, the Great, 1194-1240. Gronoe Vaughan was ancestor to Owen Tudor, who married the widow of Henry V. John of Gaunt was buried in the chapel of Grosmont Castle.

[NI0185] LORD OF CIBWYR & CAREDIGION, WAS SUMMONED TO CHESTER BY KING EDGAR. LIVED IN THE 11TH CENTURY. The great Prince of Cardigan, who married the Lady Morvydd, daughter and heir of Ynyr, King of Gwent. He died in the reign of St. Edward the Confessor, circ. 1057.
Arms of Gwaethvoed - Or, a lion rampant regardant, sable, crowned, armed, and langued gules.
Crest - A blackcock proper.

[NI0194] The sons of the dead Cunedda II were eight in number and the eldest of them was called Tybion. The Genealogies of the Princes tell us briefly that Tybion was killed in the north, and that the rest of the sons of Cunedda (the Second) came south to what is now our own country. By that brief entry, and in the story of what happened later, we can guess what happened. The law said that the eldest "efficient" man was to be elected. Gavran read that as meaning the man who could master the rest. By some treachery he killed Tybion and drove his brothers away, seizing the rule for himself.

That which was a loss to the North was a gain to the South. Here, in what is now our own home, was a swordland for warriors to win fresh homes in. Doubtless the Sons of Gwron were none to pleased to see their cousins come down from the north and cut the leart out of the kingdom of their old foes, the Sons of Gloiuda. But the brothers of dead Tybion had need of a home, and with the steel they set to work to clear one.

[NI0195] CUNEDDA CAME TO GWYNEDD IN NORTH WEST WALES FROM AMONG THE MEN OF THE NORTH, THE INHABITANTS OF SOUTHERN SCOTLAND. CUNEDDA, THE ATAVUS OF MAELGWN GWYNEED CAME WITH EIGHT SONS AND ONE GRANDSON FROM MANAW GODODDIN AND DROVE THE IRISH OUT OF GWYNEDD.
IST NATIVE RULER OF CYRURY AFTER RETIREMENT OF ROMANS IN 410.
ONLY PLACE WHERE CUNEDDA'S OWN NAME IS FOUND IS IN ALLT CUNEDDA NEAR CYDWELI. CONSIDERED AMOUNG THE FOUND-FATHERS OF THE WELSH NATION.
CUNEDDA'S FAMILY HAD BEEN IMPORTANT IN SCOTLAND FOR GENERATIONS: HIS FATHERS NAME WAS EDERN, HIS GRANDFATHER WAS PADARN PEISRUDD, AND HIS GREAT GRANDFATHER TEGID. CUNEDDA GAVE HIS SONS LATIN NAMES.
Called Gwledig, or Over-King, the perpetuator of the command and authority of the Dux Britanniarum. He was the first native ruler of the Cymry after the retirement of the romans in 410. His power extedned from Carlisle to Wearmouth, his court being held at the former place. His retinue consisted of 900 horse, and he wore the golden belt and other insignia of the office of Over-King. He was a fervent Catholic, and converted his subjects to Christianity; his descendants were, many of them, ecclesiastics, who organised the Church in his Kingdom.

Cunedda (or Cunedag) was a northern British Chieftain, a sub-King of Gododdin who ruled Manau Gododin on the Firth of Forth around Clackmannan. He was requested by the northern Welsh to help them expell the invading Irish from their lands, and he eagerly obiged. With his many sons, cunedda settled down in the area and founded a number of Royal dynasties.

[NI0197] KEREDIG-WHO GAVE HIS NAME TO KEREDIGION (CARDIGANSHIRE) WAS GRANDFATHER OF ST. DAVID, PATRON OF WALES. FIFTH IN DESCENT FROM HIM WERE ST. TEILO, PATRON OF LLANDAFF AND OF THE MATHEW CLAN, AND HIS COUSIN ST. ODOCEUS. DIED UNMARRIED 566. KING OF CARDIGAN BEFORE BROTHER TEILION. When Cunedda died, about the year 480, his son Ceretic became Gwledig after him. Gwledig meant Ruler but it differed from them in that it was never used except with the name of the man who held the office. Thus Ceretic, while he was Gwledig to one portion of his people, was Vortigern to another part, and Vortipor to others. This must be remembered. Even then all might still have been well, but for one thing. The Chief of the Angles had a daughter, one so beautiful that Ceretic fell in love with her and married her. That daughter was Alis Ronwen, or Rowena, so famous in English story.

As it sometimes happens, love blinded Ceretic to his danger. Before long he had made room for his wife's people to settle on the land. He gave them the district of Cein, or of Cynt, close under the Northern Wall. That was the beginning of ruin for him.

The full force of the mistake, however, was not felt till after the crushing defeat of the Saxons in the South of Britain in 493. That blow was so heavy that it arrested forever the increase of the Saxons in Britain. Ceretic left an evil name behind him when he died.

But he left more; he left a son whose name will be famous as long as the world endures, and brave men love a brave old story. In history we are not sure what that son was called. In story we have no trace of doubt, for there his name rings out forever as Arthur.

The sons of Ceretic ruled over Picts of Manau, and possibly over Scots of Dalriada or Argyle, over Angles of the coast of Forth, Brythons of Bernicia, and Latins of the cities along the Southern Wall.

Ceredig was born in his father's original homeland of Manau Gododdin around the Upper Firth of Forth. When called upon to expel Irish invaders from North Wales, he travelled south, with the rest of his family. He fought bravely against the advancing Gaels and his father rewarded him with the most southern area of his new kingdom, bordering on Dyfed and Cantre'r Gwaelod. The region became so associated with Ceredig that the people named it Ceredigion after him.

[NI0199] NOTES: GRANDFATHER OF MAELGWN, WHO WAS KING OVER ALL WALES. EINION;CADWALLON LAWHIR;MAELGWN, RHUN, BELI, JAGO DIED BATTLE OF CHESTER 613; CADVAN KING OF GWENT DIED 616 LLANGAADWALADR, ANGLESEA; CADWALLON DIED HEXHAM 635 ; CADWALADR DIED 664 OF PLAGUE; RHODRI KING OF THE BRITONS 754; KYNON. Cudenna placed this son to keep his court in old Caerlleon, now Chester. Einion's work would be to rule over Teyrnllwg, now Lancashire; over Corneu, now part of Cheshire and over a strip of the coast of Gwynedd, reaching to the peninsula of Creuddyn.

[NI0212] DAVID MATHEW AP THOMAS AP DAVID AP MATHEW OF ST. FAGAN'S, DIED 3 APRIL 1504, M. 1ST ALICE, DAU. & HEIR OF ROBERT VELE OF TORTWORTH, AND IN HIS RIGHT, OF ST. FAGAN'S AND LYSWORNEY; AND 2ND A DAU. OF JOHN HERBERT.

[NI0215] MORGAN MATHEW AP THOMAS AP DAVID AP MATHEW BASE SON OF THOMAS M. OF RADYR BY CATHERINE LLOYD, DAU. OF THOMAS. L1 VECHAN; M. 1ST A DAU. OF RALPH AP HOWEL AP PHILIP HIR, S.P. 2ND WENLLIAN, DAU. & HEIR OF HOWEL GOCH OF GWELDON IN CAERAU. HOWEL WAS SON OF THOMAS AP HOWEL AP JEVAN AP REES VECHAN BY CRISLY, DAU. OF THOMAS AP GRONO AP IVOR-HIR BY YNYRIS, DAU. OF PH. DAVID AP PH. HIR.

[NI0217] "The Genealogies of Glamorgan": Howel Mathew of Sweldon. Humphrey and Morris Matthew were Lords of the half of Caeran which contained Sweldon, then inhabited by Howell Mathew.

[NI0227] THOMAS MATHEW AP MORGAN AP ROBERT AP MATHEW OF CORNTOWN, MARRIED MARGARET WILLIAM, DAU. OF MATHEW WILLIAM OF CORNTOWN.

[NI0244] SIR GEORGE MATHEW M. P. HIGH SHERIFF OF GLAMORGAN, 1544. DIED 10 NOVEMBER 1557. MARRIED 1ST. MARY ANNE HERBERT, DAUGHTER OF SIR WILLIAM HERBERT OF COLEBROOK...SIR GEORGE WAS KNIGHTED IN 1553. HE REVIVED THE PRIVILEGES OF THE MARCHER LORDSHIP HELD BY HIS ANCESTORS, AND OBTAINED CONFIRMATION OF THEM FROM THE BISHOP OF LLANDAFF. SIR GEORGE WAS CUSTODIAN OF THE RELIC OF ST. TEILO. HE MARRIED 2ND BARBARA DAUGHTER AND HEIR OF SIR ROBERT BRET OF COSSINGTON. THE CHIEF DIFFERENCE IN THE FOREGOING ACCOUNT AND OTHERS IS THAT HIS FIRST WIFE IS ALSO MENTIONED AS MARGARET, DAU. OF SIR WILLIAM HERBERT OF COLEBROOK.
1153: Bishop Kitchin granted Llandaff Manor to Sir George Mathew of Radyr, knight, his heirs and assigns. This greatly impoverished to See, and even comprised the Bishop's Cstle, which seems to have been dismantled shortly afterwards.
Near the castle stands the ancient mansion of the family of Mathew of Llandaff. It was formerly called Bryn-y-gynen, but now Llandaff Court, and is supposed to have been built by David Mathew ap Ieuan Gruffydd Gethin (Rick Merrick). It was rebuilt in the 18th century and is now the palace of the Bishop of Llandaff.

[NI0250] SIR WILLIAM MATHEW OF RADYR, BORN 1531, DIED 1587; WAS SHERIFF IN 1568 AND 1580. HE MARRIED ABOUT 1550, MARGARET, DAU. OF SIR GEORGE HERBERT OF SWANSEA AND COGAN PILL.
Will, Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V:
William Mathew, esq. dated 1587 of Radyr, with house in Drury La.
Listed in will: William Lewis, esq, of the Inner Temple, executor; Barbara Mathew, daughter; Edmond Mathew, brother; Edward Mathew, brother; George Mathew, bastard son; Henry Mathew, brother; Katherine Mathew, dau. of Rimborne Mathew; Margaret Mathew, wife; Marmaduke Mathew, bastard son; Mary Mathew, eldest dau.; Rimborne Mathew, father of Katherine Mathew; William Mathew, the younger, son of Rimborne & Ma; Sir Edward Stradling, of St. Donat's, cousin; Mary Turberville, alias Turbyll; William Turberville, brother of Mary Turberville; Lewis Williams, holder of tenement bequeathed;

[NI0277] JOHN MATHEW AP MORGAN AP ROBERT AP MATHEW OF ST-Y-NILL, LIVING 1535, MARRIED ELIZABETH, DAU. OF THOMAS RAGLAN OF LLANTWIT OR LYS-Y-GRONYDD BY A SISTER TO SIR MATT. CRADOCK.

[NI0288] JANET MATHEW, M. SIR JOHN MORGAN 1491, WHO OB. 1493. HIS TOMB IS IN ST. WOOLO'S CHURCH, NEWPORT, MONMOUTH. SIR JOHN MORGAN WAS OF TREDEGAR AND LEFT SIR T. MATHEW MORGAN, AND ELIZABETH, M. TO JOHN, SEVENTH BARON CLINTON, ANCESTOR TO THE DUKES OF NEWCASTLE, AND TO THE EXTANT LORDS CLINTON.

[NI0311] JOAN MATHEW MARRIED GIBBON JENKIN OF ST. NICHOLAS; THE MOTHER OF HENRY, BASE SON BY SIR GEORGE MATHEW.

[NI0316] WILL DATED MARCH 2, 1589; NAMES HIS WIFE ELIZABETH, HIS BROTHER HOWEL, HIS SONS CHRISTOPHER, MORGAN, ROBERT, MORRICE AND SIX DAUGHTERS.

[NI0325] WILLIAM MATHEW OF LLANISHEN MARRIED ANN DAU. AND HEIR OF JENKIN MORGAN GWYN, WIDOW OF REINALT LEWIS. NO ISSUE.

[NI0347] HOWELL MATHEW HEIR-AT-LAW TO SWELDON, WHICH HE NEGLECTED TO REDEEM; HE MARRIED JANE, DAU. OF WM. THOMAS.

[NI0351] Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V.
Will dated 1550 William Mathewe of Castell y Myneich; Listed in will: Myles Mathew, son; Alice, wife; John, younger son; Robert, second son; Thomas, brother; Mathew Griffith, holder of tenement bequeathed; Llewelyn Jenkin, holder of tenement bequeathed; William ap William, holder of lands bequeathed.

[NI0429] Lord of Gwynfai and of Cardigan, who received as a gift from Fitz Hamon the Castle and Lordship of Ruthyn. Arms of Cedrych - Sable a lion rampany regardant argent, langued and armed gules.

[NI0433] First Lord of Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire. At a battle fought at the beginning of the 12th centruy he gained possession of North Wales and Denbarth; and being afterwards converted to Christianity, reigned over them in peace and wisdom for fifteen years.

[NI0451] JENKYN MATHEW AP DAVID AP DAVID AP MATHEW MARRIED LUCY OR LUCIA STARKEY, DAUGHTER AND SOLE HEIR OF WILLIAM STARKEY, BROTHER TO SIR HUMPHREY STARKEY, LORD CHIEF BARON OF THE ESCHEQUER, OTHER SOURCES SAY WITTEN STARKEY. JOHN OR JENKIN A YOUNGER SON OF SIR WILLIAM MATHEW RADYR, IS SAID IN THE WELSH PEDIGREES TO HAVE BEEN KILLED AT COWBRIDGE. BY OTHER AUTHORITIES HE IS SAID TO HAVE MARRIED LUCIE....

[NI0537] JOHN MATHEW AP JENKYN AP DAVID AP DAVID AP MATHEW OF WILTS, MARRIED MARGARET, DAU. OF WILLIAM GAMAGE OF COYTY, OR JOHN LEFT ISSUE BY AGNES DAU. OF WILLIAM GAMAGE ESQ., SECOND SON OF SIR WALTER GAMAGE.

[NI0642] THOMAS MATHEW, OF WHITWELL, MARRIED NEST, DAU. OF RICHARD OR REES JENKIN OF LLANGEINOR. HE HAD A BASE DAU.. WHO MARRIED ROBERT, AP THOMAS, AND HAD THOMAS.

[NI0727] THOMAS MATHEW OF LLANDAFF, B. 1548, D. 1577. INQ. P.M. 30 OCT. HE DIED SEIZED OF THE MANORS OF LLANDAFF, PENLLYNE, CORTON, AND LANGAN; OF 90 HOUSES IN LLANDAFF, AND OF ONE THIRD OF THE MANORS OF WENVOE, GOLDEN, AND LLANBELLO. HIS BROTHER RIMRON WAS HIS HEIR. HE MARRIED CATHERINE DAU. OF ROWLAND MORGAN OF MACHEN.

[NI0775] EDMUND MATHEW, ESQR. AFTER THE DEATH OF HIS TWO ELDER BRETHREN WITHOUT MALE ISSUE, WAS HEIR OF RADYR;

[NI0776] HENRY MATHEW OF RADYR, WAS UNDER SHERIFF TO HIS BROTHER AND IN 1590 WAS SHERIFF. HE WAS AT ONE TIME OF CANTON AND MARRIED 1ST (CATHERINE) JENET, DAU. AND CO-HEIR OF JENKYN MORGAN GWYN OF LLANISHEN; 2ND CATHERINE DAU. OF THOMAS RAGLAN OF LYS-Y-GRONYDD.
Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V. Will States:
Ales & Elenorett, maid servant; Thomas Button, occupier of tenement bequeathed; Walter Cook, servant; Lewis Fletcher; Robert Grene, holder of tanne house bequeathed; Catherin Henry, maid servant; Edmond Hugh, servant; Morgan Ievan, servant; Harry Jenkin, holder of property bequeathed; Elizabeth John; William John, boy in my house; Harry Jones, smith, occupier of tenement bequeathed; Ann Leizon, maid servant; Ievan Lewis; Rees Lewis, previous owner of land bequeathed; David Lloyd; Anne Mathew, daughter (see Stradling); Billingsley Mathew, daughter; Edmond Mathew, esq, brother; George Mathew, son of Edmond Mathew, nephew; Humfrey Mathew esq., of Castle Menych; Jennett Mathew, wife; Thomas Mathew, nephew; William Mathew, gent. of Saint Nyll; William Mathew esq., of Cardiff; Rowlands Morgan, witness; William Poell, servant; Zach Preise, witness; Geffrey Price; John Raglan; John Robert, boy in my house; Anne Stradling, wife of Lamorack Stradling, daughter; Barbara Stradling, daughter of Lamorack Stradling; Lamorack Stradling, son-in-law; Unk. Thomas, the clerck; Richard Turberville, clerck viccar of Cardyf; Maud Watkin, maid servant; Edward William, servant;

[NI0782] MATHEW OF LLANDAFF, RADIR, C. THIS VERY ANCIENT AND LONG CONTINUING FAMILY DERIVED FROM GWILYN, SON OF GWAETHFOED, LORD OF CARDIGAN, BY MORFYDD, DAU. OF YNYR, KING OF GWENT, THROUGH GRUFFYDD GETHIN, RANKED AS TENTH FROM GWAETHFOED, IVAN AP GRUFFYD GETHIN, WHO MARRIED CECIL, DAU. AND HEIRESS OF WATKIN LLEWELYN OF LLANDAFF, OF THE LINEAGE OF IESTYN AP GWRGANT. HE SETTLED AT LLANDAFF. HIS SON, MATHEW IVAN GRUFFYDD, AND HIS GRANDSON, DAVID MATHEW, INTRODUCED THE SURNAME WHICH NEVER CEASED FOR TWELVE GENERATIONS. THEY INTERMARRIED WITH THE FLEMINGS OF FLEMINGSTON, MORGANS OF TREDEGAR, GAMAGES OF COITY, STRADLINGS OF ST. DONAT'S, AND BRANCHED OFF AT EARLY PERIODS INTO THE VIGOROUS FAMILIES OF MATHEW OF CASTELL MENYCH (MONK'S CASTLE) AND MATHEW OF RADIR, MATHEW OF ABERAMAN, AND MATHEW OF SWELDOM AND LLANCAIACH, ALL OF WHOM ARE NOW EXTINCT. THE HOUSE OF LLANDAFF SUPPLIED SHERIFFS FOR GLAMORGAN IN THE YEARS 1546, 1769 AND MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT IN THE PERSON OF THOMAS MATHEW, FATHER AND SON IN 1744, 1756. THIS SAME THOMAS MATHEW, SEN., OF LLANDAFF, WAS REAR ADMIRAL AND ADMIRAL OF THE WHITE; AND THOMAS THE SON WAS A MAJOR IN THE ARMY. IN HIS ELECTION HE POLLED 954 VOTES AGAINST 212 GIVEN FOR HIS OPPONENT, CHARLES VAN, ESQ. BY HIS WIFE, ANNE, DAU. OF ROBERT KNIGHT, ESQ. OF SUTTURN, HE HAD, BESIDES SEVERAL OTHER CHILDREN, A SON, ALSO NAMED THOMAS MATHEW, ESQ., OF LLANDAFF, THE SHERIFF OF 1769, WHO DIED 1771, S. P. THE MATHEWS OF LLANDAFF BORE THE ARMS OF GWAETHFOED--OR, A LION RAMPANY REGARDANT SA., CROWNED GU.
"EDMUND MATHEW, ESQ. OF RADIR, A YOUNGER BROTHER, SUCCEEDED HIS TWO ELDER BROTHERS, WHO D.S.P., AS POSSESSOR OF THE ESTATES, AND WAS HIMSELF SUCCEEDED BY HIS ELDEST SON, GEORGE MATHEW, WHO MARRIED A DAU. OF SIR JOHN PORNES, KT., WHO WAS THE WIDOW OF THE EARL OF ORMOND, AND HAD A SON, THEOBALD MATHEW, ESQ., WHO IS CALLED IN "J.H.'S MS. 'LORD OF BISHOPSTOWN AND LLANDAFFE,' NOT OF RADIR. HE MARRIED THREE TIMES AND HAD GEORGE, TWO OTHER SONS, AND DAUS., BUT WE DISCOVER NO TRACES OF THEIR FURTHER HISTORY. THEOBALD MATHEW DIED AD 1700. NO LITTLE CONFUSION EXISTS IN THE MSS. RESPECTING THE MARRIAGES AND SUCCESSIONS OF THESE LATER MATHEWS OF RADIR; BUT ABOUT THE HIGH POSITION AND INFLUENCE OF THE FAMILY IN THIS CO. THERE CANNOT BE A DOUBT."
ANOTHER SOURCE SAYS, IN PART: "MATHEW, LORD LANDAFF. EDWARD MATHEW, OR AP-MATHEW, ANCESTOR TO THIS NOBLE LORD, RESIDED AT RADER IN THE COUNTY OF GLAMORGAN ABOUT THE YEAR 1660, WHERE HE INHERITED A GOOD ESTATE, PRINCIPALLY CONSISTING OF CHIESRIES, BEING THE REMAINS OF AN AMPLE FORTUNE POSSESSED BY HIS ANCESTORS FROM TIME IMMEMORIAL; HE WAS ALSO
POSSESSED OF THE TOWN OF LLANDAFF IN SAME COUNTY, WHENCE THE PRESENT LORD, IN WHOM IT NOW VESTS, TAKES HIS TITLE. HE LEFT ISSUE A SON GEORGE, WHO BECAME SEATED AT THURLES IN COUNTY OF TIPPERARY, TOOK TO WIFE, ELIZABETH, DAU. OF SIR JOHN POINTZ OF ACTON IN COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER, BART. (RELICT OF THOMAS BUTLER VISCOUNTY THURLES, WHO DIED BEFORE HIS FATHER WALTER ELEVENTH EARL OF ORMOND) AND BY THIS LADY WAS ANCESTOR OT THE FAMILIES OF THURLES, THOMASTOWN AND ANNFIELD, WHICH ESTATES VESTED IN THE PRESENT LORD; THE SAID GEORGE DECEASED AT TYMBY IN OCT. 1636 HAVING HAD ISSUE ONE DAU. ELIZABETH, AND TWO SON., VIZ: THEOBALD OR TOBY, HIS HEIRS; AND GEORGE.....
"SIR EDMUND MATHEW, M.D., SHERIFF, 1592. SUCCEEDED TO ALL THE ESTATES OF HIS FATHER; MARRIED THE DAU. AND HEIR OF BARTHOLOMEW SKERNE, OF LONG ASHTON; OB. 1660, AGED 102. HE CAST ORDNANCE FOR SPAIN AT HIS FURNACES NEAR CARDIFF.

"The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states: Edm. Mathewes, 1602 is to be put down for casting ordnance at his furnace near Cardiff, whence it may be easily carried into Spain; for five or six years past most that he has made has been stolen beyond seas, and as the officers of that port are poor, and dare not displease him, that place is very unfit for casting ordnance. (St. Papers Dom. 1601-3 o, 172). Edmund Mathew, the defendant, was sheriff 1593. The scene in front of Radyr Court is rather graphically protrayed. The old house, the enclosing wall and gate, the church and yew-tree hard by, are all in great part as old as the narrative, and even now not out of keeping with the figures of Master Serjeant with his mace, Sir Henry Billingsley the intruding Gloucestershire Knight, the alarmed and scared messengers of the Court upon the green in front, and the resoulte figure of Mistress Mathew at the window, with the five-score retainers of her father's family, armed with muskets and calivers, and ready to give fire and hurl down stones from the battlements. Geroge Lewis, the disconfited sheriff was of Lys-tal-y-bont and second son of Thomas Lewis, of Van. It is probable that his zeal was offical only, for his stepmother was Katherine Mathew of Radyr, and his wife, Katherine Mathew of Castell-y-Mynach, was her daughter. Like all the cadets at that period of that numerous race, he was amply provided for.
"Billingsley vs. Matthewe, May 26, 1611 - Humfrey Sheppard maketh oath, that on the 19th day of this month of May, ao.Dni. 1611, one George Mathewe eldest son of Edmond Mathewe, Esq., meeting this deponent, between Cardiff and Llandaff, using some conference to this deponent, about Sir Henry Billingsley and his proceedings in the Honourable Court of Chancery, said that, if the said Sir Henry Billingsley had or should get the possession of the lands, yet should he not quietly enjoy the same, upon an order in Chancery, adding that, "My Lord Chancellor is an old man and will not always live, and he hoped well enough to keep the premises from the said Sir Henry Billingsley", and said that 'within three days the tenants should be distrained for their rents again'; and further deposeth, that he, this deponent, with one Richard Batherne and others, having several commissions out of this hourable Court, for the apprehending of Reignold Gwynn, the said George Mathewe and other; he, the deponent, and Richard Batherne, at Llandaff, in the county of Glamorgan, the said 19th day of May, did attack and apprehend, by virture of the commission, the aforesaid Reignold Gwyn, who, at first, offered resistance, but afterwards, went quietly with them and (undertook) to enter into bond for his appearance in this honourble court; and this deponent and Batherne, with much ado, having brought the said Reignold Gwyn to Cardiff, to the house of one Henry Hoare there either to have security of him for his appearance in this honourable court or to deliver him to the Sheriff of the said county; the aforesaid George Mathewe came into the rooms of the said house, where the said Gwyn was, saying, 'Shall two carry thee from Llandaff?' and drawing out his sword, offered twice to thrust at the said Batherne and bid the said Gwyn to go his way; who, thereupon, did run forth of the house; and this deponent saith that, by reason of the noise in the said house, one John Edwards, being one of the bailiffs of said town of Cardiff, being accompanied with a great company of the townsmen, came to the door of the said Hoare, his house, and the said Edwards took the said Mathewe in his arms, Mathewe having his sword drawn, and thereupon presently, this deponent showed the said Edwards the commission, under the great seal of England, and, in the king's majesty's name, requested the said bailiff and his company to attack and apprehend the said George Mathewe and Reignold Gwyn; but the said Edwards and his company suffered them to escape, and did take from Batherne his weapons, by reason whereof this deponent and the said Batherne could not bring the bodies of the said Reignold Gwyn and George Mathewe into this honourable court, according to the contents of the commission."

Edm. Mathewes, 1602 is to be put down (discontinued) for casting ordnance at his furnace near Cardiff, whence it may be easily carried into Spain; for five or six years past most that he has made has been stolen beyond seas, and as the officers of that port are poor, and dare not displease him, that place is very unfit for casting ordnance. (St. Papers Dom. 1601-03 p. 172).

[NI0811] "The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states that Margred married Morgan Dio David, but had by Sir George Mathew a daughter, who married William Thomas of Broughton.

[NI0834] TOBIAS MATHEW, 66TH ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, WAS BORN IN 1546 IN BRISTOL, AND DIED 29 MARCH 1628. HE MARRIED FRANCES BARLOW, DAU. OF WILLIAM BARLOW. HE WS BROUGHT UP AT CHRIST CHURCH, OXFORD, D. D. AND ROSE MANY STEPS BY PREFERMENT. FIRST ARCHDEACON OF WELLS, PRIEST OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD. CANON AND DEAN OF CHRIST CHURCH, DEAN OF DURHAM AND LASTLY ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, 11 SEPT. 1606. GRADUATED AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, OXFORD, A. B. FEB. 1563/4. IN FEBRUARY 1564/5 HE WAS A MEMBER OF CHRIST CHURCH. TAKING DEGREE OF MA IN JULY 1566.
HE WAS ORDAINED THE SAME YEAR AT WHICH TIME HE WS MUCH RESPECTED FOR HIS GREAT LEARNING, SWEET CONVERSATION, FRIENDLY DISPOSITION AND SHARPNESS OF WIT. WHEN QUEEN ELIZABETH VISITED THE UNIVERSITY IN MARY'S CHURCH ON THE 3RD OF SEPT. HE ARGUED IN FAVOR OF AN ELECTIVE AS AGAINST AN HEREDITARY MONARCHY. WHEN THE QUEEN LEFT CHRIST CHURCH ON HER DEPARTURE FROM OXFORD HE BADE HER FAREWELL IN AN ELOQUENT ORATION. HIS HANDSOME PRESENCE AND READY WIT ATTRACHED THE QUEEN'S NOTICE. HE WAS AN EXCELLENT PREACHER. THE QUEEN CONTINUED HER FAVOR TO HIM THROUGHOUT HER LIFE AND WAS EQUALLY KIND TO HIS WIFE, ON WHOM SHE BESTOWED A FRAGMENT OF A UNICORN'S HORN. HIS MANY OFFICES INCLUDED THAT OF DEAN OF DURHAM IN 1583. BISHOP OF DURHAM IN 1595, BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE AND ARCHBISHOP OF YORK. HE HAD AN ADMIRABLE TALENT FOR PREACHING WHICH HE NEVER SUFFERED TO LIE IDLE, BUT USED TO GO FROM ONE TOWN TO ANOTHER TO PREACH TO CROWDED AUDIENCES. HE KEPT AN EXACT ACCOUNT OF THESE SERMONS, BY WHICH IT APPEARS THAT HE PREACHED, WHEN DEAN OF DURHAM, 321; WHEN BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE, 550; WHEN ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, 721; IN ALL 1592. IN HIS DAY, THOUGH RENOWNED AS A PREACHER, HE WAS A STATESMAN QUITE AS MUCH AS A PRELATE. THE ADVISORS OF ELIZABETH AND JAMES FELT THAT THEY COULD RELY UPON HIM TO WATCH AND GUARD THE NORTHERN SHIRES. HE DIED 29 MARCH 1628 AND WAS BURIEDIN YORK MINISTER, WHERE HIS TOMB STANDS, THE EFFIGY NOW SEPERATED, IN THE NORTH SIDE OF THE PRESBYTERY. HE MARRIED FRANCES BARLOW, DAU. OF SIR WILLIAM BARLOW, SR. WHO DIED IN 1568, SOMETIME BISHOP OF CHICHESTER AND WELLS. SHE IS DESCRIBED AS A PRUDENT AND PROVIDENT MATRON AND DIED 10 MAY 1629, AND IS DESCRIBED FURTHER AS BEING MEMORABLE FOR HAVING A BISHOP FOR A FATHER, FOUR BISHOPS FOR HER BROTHERS-IN-LAW, AND AN ARCHBISHOP FOR HER HUSBAND. HER FOUR SISTERS MARRIED BISHOPS. SHE GAVE HIS LIBRARY OF MORE THAN THREE THOUSAND VOLUMES TO THE CATHEDRAL OF YORK. THE PORTRAIT OF TOBIAS MATHEW IN CHRIST CHURCH, OXFORD, SHOWS HIM AS A SMALL MAN WITH A BEARD AND MUSTACHE TURNING GRAY.
FRANCES BARLOW HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN MARRIED TO MATTHEW PARKER, SON OF ARCHBISHOP MATTHEW PARK OF CANTERBURY (1559-1575). TOBIAS MATHEW WAS A FRIEND OF THE STUART FAMILY AND WAS ENTRUSTED WITH THE ENTERTAINMENT OF ARBELLA STUART OF BISHOPTHORPE IN 1611. AS A POLITICAL AGENT IN THE NORTH, HE FOCED RECUSANTS TO CONFORM TO THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.

[NI0858] Cardiff Records, Vol III. Ch. V. Will #13 dated 1608 includes: testator; gent, to be burined in L.....
Henry Billingsley, Sr., of Siston, current owner of lands; Joan Fleming, neice; Anne Mathew, daughter; Edmond Mathew esq., father of George Mathew; George Mathew, son of Edmond Mathew; Harry Mathew, second son; Jane Mathew, daughter; Joan Mathew, wife; Lamrock Mathew, fourth son; Margaret Mathew, daughter; Mary Mathew, daughter; Morris Mathew, father of William Mathew, godson; Robert Mathew, fifth and youngest son; Thomas Mathew, esq., of Castle Menych, witness; Thomas Mathew, eldest son; Wenllian Mathew, daughter; William Mathew esq., of Landaff, witness; William Mathew, son of Morris Mathew, godson; William Mathew, third son; Elizabeth Prichard, cousin; Henry Richard, gent of Henstod, previous owner of; Christopher St. John, daughter of Jane Mathew, grandson; Lamrock Stradling, witness; Henry Williams esq. witness;

[NI0900] Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V.:
Will dated 1591 states:
Lewis Mathew, of Tregolde, debtor; Lewis Mathew, renter of six kyne bequeathed; Edmunde Mathewe, esq, granted land bequeathed; Harry Powell, of Ragland; Catherin Richard, grandchild; Efryswyth Jenkin, sister; Juhan Jenkin, wife.

[NI1055] 1596: William Mathew, esquire, was supposed to hold this manor in socage of the Bishop. His demesne extended to the Taff bank, almost as far as Cardiff Bridge. His father in 1578 was in possession of Bryn-y-gynen manor.

[NI1096] CAPTAIN GEORGE MATHEW WAS BORN C 1581. HE MARRIED 1ST, THE DAU. OF SIR JOHN DOMES, BY WHOM HE HAD TWO CHILDREN. MRS. GEORGE MATHEW, NEE' DOMES, OB. 1610. CAPTAIN GEORGE MATHEW MARRIED 2ND, ELIZABETH, DAU. OF SIR JOHN POINTZ OF ACTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, WIDOW OF THOMAS BUTLER, VISCOUNT THURLES, WHO WAS THE OLDEST SON OF WALTER, 11TH EARL OF ORMONDE, BY WHOM SHE HAD HAD ISSUE - THREE CHILDREN, ALL OF WHOM WERE BROUGHT UP AT THOMASTOWN CASTLE. CAPTAIN GEORGE MATHEW OB. AT TENBY, OCT. 1670, AGED 89. (SUCCEEDED SIR EDMUND AS CUSTODIAN OF THE RELIC OF ST. TEILO). HE WAS THE FOUNDER OF THE IRISH BRANCH OF THE FAMILY. IN THE FUNERAL ENTRIES, VOL. VII., P. 18, PRESERVED IN THE RECORD TOWER AT DUBLIN, THE NAME OF CAPTAIN GEORGE MATHEW IS SPELT "MATTHEWES." SHORTLY AFTER HIS DECEASE HIS WIDOW ENTERED THE ORDER OF ST. BENEDICT AND OB. A NUM, CIRC. 1675. HAVING ACCEPTED THE FOREGOING AS THE RELEVANT AUTHORITY FOR THIS CAPTAIN GEORGE MATHEW, IT WOULD BE WELL, AT THIS POINT TO QUOTE DIRECTLY FROM SOME OTHER SOURCES WHICH ARE IN SLIGHT CONFLICT WITH THE SAME, CHIEFLY IN POINTS OF SPELLING, BUT ALSO IN THAT THEY ONLY MENTION HIS HAVING HAD ONE MARRIAGE. "GEORGE, ELDEST SON OF EDMOND MATHEW OF RADYR MARRIED IN 1620, HIS FIRST COUSIN, MARY, DAU. OF SIR T. POYNTZ, OF ACTON, CO. GLOUCESTER, WIDOW OF JAMES, VISCOUNT THURLES, AND MOTHER OF JAMES, FIRST DUKE OF ORMOND, AND SETTLED IN IRELAND". GEORGE MATHEW, WHO MARRIED A DAU. OF SIR JOHN PORNES, KE., WHO WAS THE WIDOW OF THE EARL OF ORMOND, AND HAD A SON, THEOBALD MATHEW., ESQ.... A SON GEORGE, WHO BECAME SEATED AT THURLES IN THE COUNTY OF TIPPERARY, TOOK TO WIFE ELIZABETH, DAU. OF SIR JOHN POINTZ OF ACTON IN COUNTY OF GLOCESTER, BART. (RELICT OF THOMAS BUTLER VISCOUNTY THURLES, WHO DIED BEFORE HIS FATHER WALTER 11TH EARL OF ORMOND) AND BY THIS LADY WAS ANCESTOR TO THE FAMILIES OF THURLES, THOMASTOWN AND ANNEFIELD, WHICH ESTATES VEFTED IN THE PRESENT LORD: THE SAID GEORGE DECEASED AT TYMBY IN OCT. 1636.... AND FINALLY, "GEORGE MATHEW OF RADYR, WHICH HE SOLD, AND MIGRATED TO IRELAND, AND WAS OF THURLES, CAPTAIN. BY THE KINDNESS OF SIR B. BURKE THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENT IS APPENDED: "GEORGE MATTHEWS OF THURLES IN THE COUNTY OF TIPPERARY, IN THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND, ESQ., S. AND H. OF EDMOND M. OF RADER IN GLAMORGANSHIRE IN WALES ENG., TOOKE TO WIFE ELIZABETH, D. OF SIR JOHN POINTZ OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE IN THE KINGDOM OF ENGLAND, KT. AND BT. AND RELICT OF THE R. H. THOMAS BUTLER VISCOUNT OF THURLES AFORESAID, BY WHOM HE HAD ISSUE 2 SONNES AND ONE DAUGHTER...THE SAID GEORGE DEPARTED THIS MORTALL LIFE AT TYMBY AND WAS INTERRED AT TYMBY AFORESAID THE __ OF OCTOBER 1636". HIS WILL WAS DATED 3 SEPT. 1670. THE FOREGOING 1636 IS OBVIOUSLY A MISPRINT IN THE SOURCE CITED.

"The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states:
By the kindness of Sir B. Burke the following document is appended: (same as above except the following): Vidt. Toby eldest sonne and George 2nd sonne. Frances the only d. of the said George. The said George departed this mortall life at Tymby and was interred at Tymby aforesaid the - of Oct. 1636. (Fun. entries, vol. vii p. 18)

[NI1098] ACCOMPANIED HIS BROTHER CAPT. GEORGE TO IRELAND, OB. S.P. 1650, LEAVING HIS PROPERTY TO HIS NEPHEWS TOBY AND GEORGE, GOVERNOR OF THE GARRISON IN GREEN CASTLE. LETTERS OF HIS ARE AMONG THE MSS. IN THE ARCHIVES OF KILKENNY CASTLE, SEAT OF THE MARQUESS OF ORMONDE.

[NI1100] WILLIAM MATHEW OF WHITCHURCH, WS MAYOR OF CARDIFF, 1644, AND GOVERNOR OF CARDIFF CASTLE, 1646. HE MARRIED 1ST ABOUT 1640, ELIZABETH, DAU. OF THOMAS POWELL OF LLOYDARTH IN LLANGONYDD, WIDOW OF WM. WADE.

[NI1141] EDMUND MATHEW, WHO MORTGAGED SWELDON FOR 100 POUNDS AND DID NOT REDEEM IT.

[NI1331] TOBY MATHEW WHO ACCOMPANIED HIM (E.G. CAPTAIN GEORGE) TO IRELAND, 1610, AND WAS DROWNED WHEN RETURNING TO ENGLAND WITH VISCOUNT THURLES, BRINGING MONEY FROM HIS FATHER FOR LEWIS OF VAN, TO PAY OFF THE MORTGAGES ON THE RADYR ESTATE. THE SHIPWRECK OCCURRED ON THE SKERRIES, 15 DEC. 1619, AND ALL HANDS PERISHED.

[NI1332] WILLIAM MATHEW, WHO LAST HAD CHARGE OF THE RELIC OF ST. TEILO, OB. S. P. 1658, AT LLANDEILO, IN PEMBROKESHIRE, WHEN THE RELIC PASSED INTO OTHER HANDS....

[NI1334] ESQ., OF THURLES AND ANNEFIELD, AFTER OF ST. JAMES, WESTMINSTER; WILL DATED 22 FEB. 1696, DIED 1 DEC. 1699;

[NI1339] Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V.
Will dated 1710; gentleman of Fairwater.
William Lewis, neighbour of land in Fairwater; Ann Mathews, daughter; Anthony Mathews, son; Mary Mathews, daughter;

[NI1377] CHRISTOPHER MATHEW OF LLANELAY WHOSE NAME APPEARS ON THE COURT ROLLS OF EAST ORCHARD IN 1716.

[NI1523] DAVID MATHEW OF LLANDAFF, BORN 1611 SET DOWN FOR THE ROYAL OAK, 1662, AS HAVING 1,200 POUNDS PER ANNUM. "RAWDON, VISITING LLANDAFF IN 1665, MENTIONS THE MATHEW CASTLE AS A RUIN. THIS WAS THE BISHOP'S PALACE, ALIENATED WITH THE MANOR FROM THE SEA, PROBABLY BY ONE OF THE BISHOPS."
HIS NAME WILL BE FOUND IN THE LIST OF ESQUIRES AND OTHER GENTLEMEN OF QUALITY TAKEN PRISONERS AT THE SURRENDER OF RAGLAN CASTLE AUG 28, 1646 AND PERMITTED TO PASS FREE ON HIS PAROLE OF HONOUR. AFTER THIS HE COURTED AND WOOED AND WON FAIR MISTRESS JOAN STRADLING, HIS COUSIN, OF ST. DONAT'S CASTLE. KING CHARLES IN HIS DIARY SETS DOWN THE INCOME OF DAIVD MATHEW, THEN RESIDING AT LLANDAFF, AT 600 POUNDS PER ANNUM.
TO AVOID LLANDAFF, WITH ITS PLOTTINGS AND PLANNINGS DAVID AND HIS WIFE BETOOK THEMSELVES TO THE SECLUSION OF ST. DONAT'S THE LONELY CASTLE BY THE SEA. A YEAR LATER AN OLD BLACK LETTER BIBLE, PUBLISHED IN 1633, WAS BROUGHT INTO REQUISITION AND ON ITS FIRST PAGE INSCRIBED THE INTERESTING RECORD "EDWARD, THE SONNE OF DAVID MATHEW, OF LLANDAFF, BY JOAN STRADLING HIS WIFE, WAS BAPTISED ATT ST. DONAT'S ONN THE 22 DAY OF JANUARIE, 1648."
Cardiff Records, Vol. III. Ch. V. Will dated 1681 includes:
Joan Mathew, daughter of Sir Edward Stradling; Capt. Thomas James; Joan Stradling, (see Joan Mathew);
"The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states:
Set down for the Royal Oak, 1662, as having 1,200 pounds per annum. Rawdon, visiting Llandaff in 1665, mentions the Mathew Castle as a ruin. This was the Bishop's Palace, alienated with the manor from the see, probably by one of the Bishops. He married before 1678 Jane, dau. of Sir Edward Stradling of St. Donats.

[NI1527] WILLIAM MATHEW OF PENNYTENNY, IN ST. KEW, AND OF TRESUNGHER, IN ST. ENDELLYON, CO. CORNWALL (GRANDSON OF WILLIAM OF PENNYTENNY, AND EMMELINE ROUS) M. SIBYLLA, DAU. AND HEIR OF JOHN ROSCARROCK, OF ROSCARROCK, MP CO. CORNWALL (ONE OF THE MOST ANCIENT FAMILIES IN THE COUNTY) LADY IN WAITING TO THE QUEEN.

[NI1536] GEORGE MATHEW OF THURLES, OF WHICH MANOR HE HAD A LEASE FROM THE DUKE OF ORMOND, 11 JUNE 1683, DIED 7 DECEMBER 1735; SOLD BISHOPSTON IN GOWER TO GABRIEL POWEL OF SWANSEA; LL.D.OXON., 6 AUG. 1677; MARRIED 1ST CECILIA, DAU. OF FRANCIS ARUNDEL OF DYLES; MARRIAGE ARTICLES DATED 1 JULY 1677; 2ND MARY, DAU. OF SIR RICHARD ALDWORTH, KT., OF NEWMARKET; MARRIAGE ARTICLES DATED 16 OCT. 1686. SHE WAS WIDOW OF SIR SIMON EATON.

[NI1548] Thomas Mathew, sixth son of Theobald Mathew by Ann Saule; was of Annefield. Signed an address to Charles II in 1683; died about 1714.

[NI1597] CATHERINE MATHEW, "WHO LOST BOTH HER PARENTS AT ABOUT THE SAME TIME WHILE A CHILD, BY WHICH REASON THE SWELDON ESTATE WAS NOT REDEEMED FROM 'GREAT AND POWERFUL HANDS INTO WHICH IT HAD FALLEN'. SHE MARRIED RICHARD TRUMAN.

[NI1631] THOMAS MATHEW, MARRIED THREE WIVES. HE LIVED IN THE ISLANDS AND HAD A SON.

[NI1723] SIR JOHN MATHEW, "OF TRESUNGHER AND PENNYTENNY, WHO TOOK AN ACTIVE PART WITH HIS RELATIVES, SIR RICHARD AND SIR BEVIL GRENVILLE, IN THE CIVIL WARS OF THE WEST OF ENGLAND. HE REBUILT, IN 1663, THE PRESENT CASTELLATED MANSION OF TRESUNGHER, WHICH HAD BEEN TOTALLY DESTROYED IN THE WAR. HE MARRIED MARY, DAU. OF JOHN VIVIAN, OF TREWAN, ESQ. MP (OF THE FAMILY OF THE CELEBRATED JOHN VIVIAN PRIOR OF BODMIN) AND WAS GRANDFATHER OF MARY BOND, WHO CARRIED THE ESTATE OF TRESUNGHER WITH HERSELF, IN MARRIAGE TO CHARLES VYVYAN, ESQ. SECOND SON OF SIR R. VYVYAN, OF TRELOWARREN BUT OTHER ESTATES AND THE REPRESENTATION OF THE FAMILY DEVOLVED UPON HER COUSIN COLONEL ABEDNEGO MATHEW.

[NI1805] THOMAS MATHEWS OF LLANDAFF COURT, WHICH HE BUILT, AND WHICH IS NOW THE BISHOP'S PALACE; M.P. GLAMORGAN 1744; ADMIRAL OF THE WHITE, AND REAR-ADMIRAL OF GREAT BRITAIN, AND COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE MEDITERANEAN FLEET. AFTER LONG AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE, HE WAS DISMISSED BY COURT MARTIAL FOR MISCONDUCT IN HIS ATTACK ON THE COMBINED FLEETS OF FRANCE AND SPAIN IN FEB. 1744. HE WAS A MAN OF VIOLENT TEMPER, A STRONG WHIG IN OPPOSITION TO THE MINISTRY, AND HE HAD QUARRELLED WITH LESTOCK HIS SECOND IN COMMAND. THERE WAS TWO OPINIONS ON THE JUSTICE OF HIS SENTENCE. WILLIAM IV THOUGHT HIM ILL USED AND PLACED HIS PORTRAIT IN GREENWICH HOSPITAL. WILL DATED 1749; TRUSTEES, MILICENT MATHEWS, HESTER FULLER, JOHN BAYNARD, CHARLES JONES AND JOHN SCOTT. HE DIED AT PENCOED CASTLE, CO. MON., 2 OCT. 1751. WILL PROVED IN LONDON 28 OCT. HE PURCHASED PENCOED;
FROM AN ARTICLE PUBLSHED IN GREAT BRITAIN, ENTITLED "NOTABLE MEN OF WALES" A COPY OF WHICH WAS OBTAINED FROM THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF WALES, WHO UNFORTUNATELY DID NOT PROVIDE FULL BIBLIOGRAPHICAL PARTICULARS, THE FOLLOWING ACCOUNT OF ADMIRAL THOMAS MATHEW IS TAKEN:- -
ADMINRAL MATHEW BEING A WELSHMAN BY BIRTH AND LONG DESCENT, WE MAY BE PERMITTED TO REFER FOR A MONENT TO WHAT IS DESIGNATED BY AN ENGLISH JOURNAL AS 'A REALLY SPLENDID PEDIGREE OF THE BLOOD ROYAL OF WALES, MINUTELY TRACED THROUGH ELVORACH, LORD OF TORKELYN.' IT NEEDS NO VERY DISCRIMINATING WELSH GENEALOGIEST TO DECIDE THAT THE WORD "ELVORACH" SHOULD BE WRITTEN IVOR BACH, NOT INDEED THE IVOR BACH RENOWNED IN WELSH HISTORY AS THE WARRIOR WHO STORMED CARDIFF CASTLE AND CARRIED OFF ITS COUNT; BUT HIS UNCLE, "IVOR," ALSO SMALL OF STATURE, SON OF CADIVOR, LORD OF CAERPHILLY, WHO HAD MARRIED MYFANWY, DAU. OF GWRGAN, PRINCE OF GLAMORGAN, CADIVOR, WHEN OVER NINETY YEARS OF AGE--EAGER TO STRIKE A LAST BLOW FOR THE FREEDOM OF HIS COUNTRY--WITH HIS TOW SONS, IVOR AND GRIFFITH, AND THE REMNANT OF HIS FATHER CEDRICH'S CONTINGENT, LAY IN AMBUSH IN THE PASS OF ABERLECH, AND CUT OFF AND ALMOST ANNIHILATED THE ALREADY ROUTED NORMAN HORSEMEN. THIS WAS AT THE BATTLE OF GELLIGAER, FOUGHT IN 1194. ONE OF IVOR'S SONS WAS AEDDAN OR ARTHENUS, WHO TOOK THE CROSS AT THE HANDS OF ARCHBISHOP BALDWIN, AND WHOSE MARRIAGE WITH JOAN, DAU. AND HEIRESS OF SIR JOHN RUSSELL, ONE OF THE GREAT BARONS OF THE PERIOD, WHOSE NAME IS ON THE ROLL OF BATTLE ABBEY AS HAVING HELD THE "HONOUR OF RUSSELL", WAS DOUBTLESS THE MEANS OF CONFIRMING TO THE MATHEW CLAN THE LARGE ESTATES OF WHICH THEY WERE FOR CENTURIES THE POSSESSORS.
Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V:
Listed in will included: Henrietta Mathews, granddaughter; Henrietta Mathews, late wife; Jane Mathews, granddaughter; Millicent Mathews, granddaughter; Millicent Mathews, wife; Thomas Mathews, grandson; Thomas Mathews (Major), son; Andrew Robinson esq, cousin; John Scot, secretary; Henry Toms, surgeon;
William Young, secretary to the late Lord Berkel.
"The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states: Thomas Mathew of Llandaff Court, which he built and which is now the Bishop's Palace; M.P. Glamorgan, 1744; Admiral of the White, and Rear-Admiral of Great Britain, and Commander-in-cheif of the Mediterranean Fleet. After long and distinguished service, he was dismissed by Court Martial for misconduct in his attack on the combined fleets of France and Spain in Feb. 1744. He was a man of violent temper, a strong Whig in opposition to the ministry, and he had quarrelled with Lestock his second in command. There were two opinions on the justice of his sentence. William IV thought him ill-used and placed his portrait in Greenwich Hospital. Will dated 1749; trustees, Milicent Mathews, Hester Fuller, John Baynard, Charles Jones and John Scott. He died at Pencoed Castle, Monmouth, Oct. 2, 1751. Will proved in London Oct. 28, 1751. He purchased Pencoed.

[NI1823] GEORGE MATHEWS OF THURLES AND THOMASTOWN, MARRIED 1ST MARGARET, DAU. OF THOS. BUTLER OF KILCASH, DIED 30 JULY 1743; 2ND ISABELLA, DAU. OF W. BROWNLOW, OF LURGAN, WHO MARRIED 2 SEPT. 1761, MAJOR FORD. HE SUCCEEDED TO THE THOMASTOWN PROPERTY IN 1740, ON THE DEATH OF "GRAND GEORGE". BY WILL HE LEFT ALL HIS ESTATES TO HIS KINSMAN, THOMAS MATHEW OF ANNEFIELD.

[NI1829] THOMAS MATHEWS OF ANNEFIELD, AND LONDON IN 1765, SUCCEEDED TO THE IRISH AND WELSH ESTATES, INCLUDING THURLES AND LLANDAFF, UNDER THE WILL OF HIS KINSMAN, 7 FEB. 1759, GEORGE MATHEW. HIS OWN WILL WAS DATED 10 OCT. 1777; PROVED 23 MAY 1781,. EXECUTORS, HIS BROTHERS JOHN AND GEORGE. HE MARRIED 6 JULY 1736, MARY, ELDEST DAU. OF RICHARD MATHEW OF DUBLIN CITY; SHE DIED BEFORE JUNE 1746. ANOTHER SOURCE SAYS: "THOMAS MARRIED MARY, EDLEST OF RICHARD MATTHEWS OF CHARFIELD, AND USHER'S QUAY, DUBLIN, 31 JULY 1736. (THE ENTRY IS IN THE BURIALS REGISTER AT ST. AUDOEN'S DUBLIN.) HE RESTORED AND ENLARGED THOMASTOWN CASTLE, SPENDING THE INCOME OF THE ESTATE FOR SEVEN YEARS UPON THE WORK. THE GARDENS WERE LAID OUT BY ITALIAN HORTICULTURISTS. DURING THE RESTORATION THOMAS MATHEW RESIDED WITH HIS WIFE IN FRANCE, WHERE BOTH HIS CHILDREN WERE BORN. HE WAS RENOWNED FOR HIS SKILL AS A SWORDSMAN, AND FOR HIS LAVISH HOSPITALITY FROM THE DATE THAT HE INHERITED THE ESTATES IN GLAMORGAN, MONMOUTH, AND IRELAND, UNDER THE WILL OF GEORGE MATHEW THE YOUNGEST, WHO OB. 1760. HIS PORTRAIT WAS AT THOMASTOWN. IN 1765 A MEMBER OF THE PENEFATHER FAMILY (WHO WERE PROTESTANTS) TOOK A FANCY TO A PAIR OF FINE HORSES, DRIVEN BY THOMAS MATHEW, AS THEY WERE TRAVELLING TOGETHER TO THOMASTOWN. HE HANDED THOMAS MATHEW 10 POUNDS, AND REQUESTED HIM, AS A PAPIST, TO SURRENDER THEM, WHICH HE RELUCTANTLY WAS OBLIGED TO DO UNDER THE PENAL STATUTES OF THE PERIOD. HE, BEING GRATLY ANNOYED, AT ONCE PROCEEDED TO THE PALACE OF THE PROTESTANT ARCHBISHOP OF CASHEL, DR. BUTLER, AND IS SAID TO HAVE ADDRESSED HIM AS FOLLOWS:--"MY LORD, IF TO SWEAR THAT YOUR RELIGION IS BETTER FOR A MAN THAN MINE MAKS ONE A GOOD PROTESTANT, I CALL UPON YOUR LORDSHIP TO RECEIVE MY RECANTATION," THE ARCHBISHOP NATURALLY COMPILED, AND THOMAS MATHEW IMMEDIATELY SENT TO MR. PENNEFATHER, WHO WAS OBIGED TO RETURN THE HORSES. THOMAS MATHEW WAS NEVER KNOW TO ATTEND A PROTESTANT CHURCH, NEITHER DID HIS SON, NOR ANY OF HIS GRANDCHILDREN EVER DO SO, EXCEPT ON THE OCCASIONS OF MARRIAGES AND FUNERALS. HIS WIFE OB. 1746. HE OB. AT THOMASTOWN, 1774, LEAVING HIS WHOLE ESTATE TO HIS ONLY LEGITIMATE SON, FRANCIS, BY HIS WILL, PROVED 23 MAY 1781, HIS BROTHERS JOHN AND GEORGE BEING THE EXECUTORS. (HE LEFT A NATURAL SON CALLED JAMES MATHEW, WHO WAS BAIFIFF ON THE TIPPERARY ESTATE.
1763: The Manor of Llandaff was in the hands of Thomas Mathew of Thomastown, Co. Tipperary; who this year appointed his kinsman Anthony Mathews of Leckwith, gamekeeper of the manor.
1765: Per The Genealogies of Glamorgan, Thomas Mathew of Annefield, and London in 1765, succeeded to the Irish and Welsh estates, including Thurles and Llandaff, under the will of his kinsman, Feb. 7, 1759, George Mathew. His own will was dated Oct. 10, 1777, proved May 23, 1781; Executors, his brothers John and George.

[NI1849] Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. VI. Glamorgan Co. Records. Cardiff districk Order Books (1780-1811). Mr. Blethin Matthew in 1810 page 266, was given notice.

[NI1858] ANDREW MATHEW DIED IN LONDON, WILL, 1 JUNE 1699, MENTIONS HIS SON HUMPHREY, AND HIS DAU. ANNE; PROVED LONDON, 30 SEPT. 1706. HUMPHREY WAS BORN AT ABERTHIN, AND BURIED AT YSTRAD OWEN. HE WAS FATHER OF EVAN AND OF TWO OTHER SONS, WHO LEFT NO LAWFUL ISSUE....

[NI1882] THOMAS WILLIAM MATHEWS OF LLANDAFF, "MAJOR IN THE ARMY, WHICH HE LEFT UPON THE SENTENCE OF HIS FATHER B. 1711; M.P. GLAMORGAN 1756, WHEN HE POLLED 954 VOTES AGAINST 212 FOR CHARLES VAN; M. ANN, DAU. OF ROBERT KNIGHT OF CONGRESBURY, CO. SOM., AND SUTTERN, CO. GLAMORGAN, BY CECIL, DAU. AND HEIR OF EDWARD TURBERVILLE OF S. BY A DAU. AND HEIR OF WATKYN LLOUGHOR OF TYTHEGSTON."

[NI1884] COLONEL ABEDNEGO MATHEWS WAS GOVERNOR OF ST. CHRISTOPHER'S IN WHICH ISLAND AND IN ANTIGUA, HE RECEVIED GRANTS OF LANDS, NOW POSSESSED BY THE FAMILY, S SOME COMPENSATION FOR THE GREAT LOSSES THEY HAD SUSTAINED BY THE CIVIL WARS. COL. MATHEWS DIED 8 APRIL 1681, AGE 52, LEAVING ISSUE BY HIS WIFE SUSANNA SPARROW, AN HEIRESS.

[NI1898] FRANCIS MATHEWS BORN SEP 1738, OF THURLES CASTLE; OCT 12, 1783 CREATED BARON LLANDAFF OF THOMAS TOWN; DEC. 1793, VISCOUNT OF LLANDAFF; NOV 1797, EARL OF LLANDAFF, ALL IN THE PEERAGE OF IRELAND; DIED SWNSEA, SEPT. 1806; INTESTATE; MARRIED 1ST 6 SEPT. 1764, ELLIS, DAU. OF JAMES SMYTH OF TINNEY PARK, WICKLOW, SISTER OF SIR SKEFF, SMYTH, BT., SHE DIED AUG. 1781; 2ND CATHERINE SKEFFINGTON, DAU. OF CLOTWORTHY, FIRST EARL OF MASSAREENE, BAPTISED 15 JULY 1752; MARRIED JUNE 1784; DIED 1795.
1777: Francis Mathew of Thomastown demised the Lordship of Llandaff for a term of years to Anthony Mathew of Leckwith.

[NI1900] JAMES MATHEWS, A "NATURAL SON...WHO WAS BAILIFF ON THE TIPPERARY ESTATE. HE MARRIED AND LEFT ISSUE FOUR SONS, OF WHOM TWO, FRANK AND TOM ARE BURIED IN GOLDEN CEMETERY. THE ELDEST SON, CHARLES, RESIDED AT LEHENA HOUSE, CORK, AND WAS THE FATHER OF MR. JUSTICE MATHEW. THE SECOND SON, THEOBALD, WAS EDUCATED BY LADY ELLISHA MATHEW...HE ENTERED THE CAPUCHIN ORDER, AND BECAME RENOWNED AS "THE APOSTLE OF TEMPERANCE." HE OB. AT LEHENA HOUSE, CORK, 8 DEC. 1856

[NI1929] "The Genealogies Of Glamorgan" states Died 1782 without issue having ruined his estate. He left Llandaff Court to his wife's nephew, Mr. Richards of Cardiff. He does not appear to have had the manor of Llandaff. He married Diana, dau. of Robert Jones of Fonmon Castle, living 1798. General Wood purchased a large share of the property.

[NI1938] WILLIAM MATHEWS "ENTERING AT AN EARLY AGE (IN 1679) IN THE COLDSTREAM REGIMENT, RAISED BY HIS RELATIVE, GENERAL MONK (DUKE OF ALBEMARLE) WAS HIGHLY DISTINGUISHED IN THE VARIOUS ACTIONS OF THE SUBSEQUENT WAR. ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY OF THE SERVICES OF THIS GALLANT CORPS, HE WAS SEVERLY WOUNDED AT NEERWINDEN, AND WAS PROMOTED TO THE COMMAND OF THE REGIMENT AT NAMUR. HE WAS AN EQUERRY TO HER MAJESTY, AND WENT OUT IN COMMAND OF THE BRIGADE OF GUARDS IN THE EXPEDITION TO SPAIN, UNDER THE EARL OF ORMONDE, IN 1702. THE FOLLOWING YEAR HE WAS MADE A KNIGHT OF THE BATH, AND IN 1704 WAS APPOINTED CAPT.-GENERAL AND LORD HIGH ADMIRAL OF THE WINDWARD AND LEEWARD ISLANDS, AND DIED AT THE SEAT OF GOVERNMENT IN ANTIGUA, THE FOLLOWING YEAR. GENERAL SIR WILLIAM MATHEW MARRIED CATHERINE, BARONESS VAN LEEMPUTT, OF HOLLAND, MAID OF HONOUR TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN MARY.

[NI1941] 1818: Francis James Mathew, Earl of Llandaff, and others, conveyed this manor to Sir Samuel Romilly, knight.

[NI1946] Elizabeth Mathew, final heir, who left the estates to her cousin, Louis de Rohan, Viscomte de Chabot, whose son, Comte de Jarnac, resided at ThomasTown; she died single, 1843

[NI1948] WALTER MATHEWS "WHO SOLD MELIN GRIFFITH TO THE BROTHERS, AND DIED IN AMERICA, S. P.

[NI2105] Osmael must have been the son his father loved the most. For he asked for no proud old city like Chester to be his portion. He did not need any vast fortification to be his defence, like the wall in the far north. Sword in hand he plunged into the thick of the Scots of Mon and Arvon, to cut off Vortigern's armies at the point where the fleets came to land when they brought fresh armies of Scots from Erin. Osmael his father had named him, but you will not find it written in any of the pedigrees of the four old fighting clans descended from him. Two of those clans, at different times afterwards, were appointed champions and bodyguard of the Kings of Cymru, for their splendidness and their bravery, but they trace their descent from Gwron. For thus was Osmael known to his brothers and descendatns-Gwron-the Hero. A proud man he may be who traces his descent from such a man.

He fell beneath the javelins in old Mon of the Druids, as we may well believe. For in that isle, where his descendants had their portion, there was a spot called Maes Osmelion-the Field of the Descendants of Osmael.

[NI2110] NOTE: THE VICTORY OF CADWALLON LAWHIR, THE GRANDSON OF CUNEDDA OVER THE IRISH AT CERRIG Y GWYDDEL NEAR TERFDRAETH, ANGLESEY WAS FINAL.

[NI2111] POWERFUL KING OF GREAT STATURE OVER ALL OF WALES. UNITED LAND OF GWYNEDD. SEAT OF POWER WAS DEGANNWY. CALLED DRAGON OF THE ISLAND. DIED OF THE YELLOW PLAGUE AND BURIED AT LLANRHOS. ALSO KNOWN AT MAGLOCUNUS. SAID TO HAVE MURDERED HIS WIFE, THE SISTER OF BROCHWEL YSGITHROG KING OF POWYS, AND HIS NEPHEW IN ORDER TO MARRY THE NEPHEWS WIFE.

[NI2112] SOME SOURCES SAY THAT SANT AP CEREDIG MAY NOT HAVE BEEN MARRIED BUT MAY HAVE TAKEN NON (A NUN) BY FORCE BECAUSE OF HER BEAUTY.

[NI2115] POWER CHIEFTAIN OF GWENT WHO FLOURISHED IN THE REIGN OF HENRY II. TOOK THE CROSS FROM ARCHBISHOP BALDWIN WHEN IN 1187 HE PREACHED THE CRUSADE AT LLANDAFF. HE MARRIED ANNE, DAU. AND HEIR OF SIR JOHN RUSSELL.
ARMS, ADDED BY AEDDAN TO THE ANCESTRAL COAT - OR A SALTIRE ARGENT.
ARMS OF ANNE RUSSELL - ARGENT, ON A BEND SABLE, THREE SWANS CLOSE ARGENT, BEAKED, &C. GULES.

[NI2119] EPITAPH AT LLANGARDWALADR NEAR ABERFFRAW IN ANGLESEA.

[NI2120] UNITED THE WHOLE OF CYMRY IN CLOSING STRUGGLES WITH THE ANGLES OF NORTHUMBRIA. ALSO KNOWN AT CATGUOLLAUN. KILLED FOSTER BROTHER EDWIN IN BATTLE OF NORTHUMBRIA.

[NI2125] KILLED IN 632 BY CADWALLON IN BATTLE OF HATFIELD.

[NI2132] BECAME KING OF GWYNEDD IN 825 ON THE DEATH OF ESYLLTS UNCLE HYWEL AP RHODRI.
The descendants in the male line of this line of Powys were landowning chiefs in Elizabeth's day.

[NI2135] Rhodri Mawr, son of Merfyn (Mermin) Frych or (Vrych). By the death of Merfyn he had become head of the line of Gwynedd. Afterwards, by his marriage with a daughter of Meurig ab Dyfnwallon, he became lord of Ceredigion and Ystrad Towi on the death of her brother Gwgan. According to Rhys and Brynmor-Jones, who follow Powel and other Welsh historians, Rhodri probably also became the ruler of Powys, through his grandmother Nest, sister and heiress of Congen ab Cadell, king of Powys. Rhodri's dominions included the remainder of Wales, except Dyfed, Morgannwg (Glamorgan) and those principalities roughly corresponding to the modern Brecknockshire and Radnor, and it is claimed, and admitted as possible by Rhys and Brynmor-Jones, that he exercised an over-lordship even over these territories.
Rhodri had continual conflicts with the Mercians and Danes.
855 Slays the Danish chief Horm in single combat.
876 Defeated by the Saxons, and obliged to flee to Ireland.
877 Returns to Wales, and is slain in battle with the Saxons, together with his brother Gwriad, being aged 89 years.
Rhodri Mawr is stated to have divided his kingdom into three parts, Gwynedd (north wales), Powys, and Deheubarth (south wales), to the government of which he nominated his three eldest sons; but this has been doubted, and it seems more probable that after Rhodri's death these sons divided the country themsleves.

[NI2138] 1ST IN LINE OF THE HOUSE OF GWYNEDD. SOME SAY DIED 942.
COULD HAVE BEEN BORN IN TEGAINGLE, FLINT, WALES
ASSER STATES THAT THE SMALLER RULERS OF WALES ASKED HIM FOR HIS PATRONAGE AND THAT ANARAWD AP RHODRI, KING OF GWYNEDD AND POWYS, FOLLOWED THEIR EXAMPLE, ABANDONING HIS ALLIANCE WITH THE DANISH KINGDOM OF YORK. IT IS LIKELY THAT HIS BROTHER CADELL, RULER OF SEISYLLWG, DID THE SAME.
He defeated the Saxons in 880, near Conway, in a battle called Rhodri's Revenge and died in 915.

[NI2139] 880 Cadell is said to have taken part in the battle of Conway, called "Rhodri's Revenge," when his brother Anarawd, prince of North Wales defeated the Saxons.
893 The Saxons, under Elfred, having invaded Cadell's territory, Cadell and Anarawd abandon the relation which they had established with the Northumbrians and seek the friendship of Elfred, probably 897.
The residence and seat of government of the princes of South Wales was at Dinefwr (Dynevor, Dinevawr) the great palace, on the bank of the river Towi, in what is now Carmarthenshire. Here a castle which, after the custom of the time, was doubtless of timber, had been erected by Rhodri Mawr. This structure was replaced by a stronghold built of stone and mortar by the Lord Rhys, which, in subsequent wars was repeatedly captured and retaken, and the ruins of which are now (1911) still to be seen.
The territory over which the princes of South Wales ruled as over-lords or as their individual possessions, varied considerably at different periods, according to the fortunes of war. It is commonly supposed to have corresponded nearly to the present counties of Cardigan, Carmarthen, Pembroke, Glamorgan, Monmouth, Brecknock, Radnor and part of Hereford, but within this territory were several separate governments, such as Glamorgan, Dyfed, and others, ruled by their own lords, or, as they early called themselves, kings, and over these petty governments, the princes of South Wales ruled, for most of the time, but not always, as over-lords only.
The princes, after Rhodri's time seem to have always held the "Kingdom of Ceredigion" and Ystrad Towi as their individual possessions. This districk roughly corresponded to the present Cardiganshire and the greater part of the modern Carmarthenshire, and it was within these counties that the descendants of the Lord Rhys continued to hold vast possessions until conquered by Edward I in 1282-3.
Cadell, Prince of South Wales; died 907, having some years before seized the government of Powys, and slain his brother Merfyn in battle in 900. The name of his wife is uncertain.

Cadell was given the Kingdom of Seisyllwg by his father, Rhodri Mawr in the late 9th century. However, it is unclear how much independence he managed to assert after his father's death. His son, Hywel Dda (the Good) married the heiress of the King of Dyfed and united the two Kingdoms to become the first King of Deheubarth.

[NI2140] Merfyn, Prince of Powys; defeated by his brother Cadell, who deprived him of Powys, 887, slain in 900.

[NI2141] IT UNDOUBTEDLY CONTAINED AN ELEMENT OF COERCION, AS IS DEMONSTRATED BY THE FATE OF IDWAL AP ANARAWD, WHO RAISED THE STANDARD OF REVOLT AND WHO WAS KILLED BY THE ENGLISH IN 942.

[NI2149] PRINCE OF GWYNEDD FROM 1081-1137. IN 1063 WAS LIVING IN IRELAND WITH MOTHER.

[NI2152] PRINCE OF SOUTH WALES 1137-1170. SUCCEDED FATHER IN 1137. CAPTURED RHUDDLAN CASTLE IN 1166.

[NI2156] OTHER BIRTH SHOW BORN 1080 CAERLLEON, MONMOUTH, ENGLAND.
Prince of South Wales, eldest surviving son of Rhys ap Tewdwr.
Rhys ap Tewdwr says Powel, had "a sonne called Gruffyth, who at his father's death was a verie child". He was, probably about 12 years old in 1093 and doubtless, the youngest of the children of Rhys's last wife.
1115: Gruffydd having been sent to Ireland, was recalled by his brother-in-law Gerald, husband of his sister Nest.
Being acused to the King of England of trying to stir up a revolt, he seeks the aid of Gruffydd ap Cynan, Prince of North Wales, who receives him kindly, but arranges to murder him, in order to obtain a reward from the king. Warned by his sister Nest, however, he escapes to Lleyn, where he takes sanctuary in the church of Aberdaron, which stands on the sea coast almost at the extreme end of Lleyn, and is probably not much altered, so far as the walls are concerned, since Gruffydd took refuge therein. There doorway is early Norman.
Gruffydd ap Cynan's men pursue him, and attempt to drag him from the sanctuary; but the clergy interfere, and Gruffydd escapes in a fishing boat.
1115: Rebels against the English, and with a handful of follwers, attacks the English outpost, ravaging the borders of Dyfed and Ceredigion.
1116: Sacks and burns the castle near Abberth, (Narberth). Attacks the castle of Llanymddyfri (Llandovery); but is defeated. Destroys the outer works of the castle of Swansea, and takes Carmarthen Castle; also a castle in Gower, to the garrison of which he gives no quarter. Captures the castle of Kidwelli from de Londres, its governor.
The leading chieftains of Ceredigion now do homage to Gruffydd, as prince of South Wales. And with their assistance, Griffith not only demolished many castles and took great spoils, but also regained a portion of the lands and possessions of his father in these parts.
Gruffydd retreats to the wilds of Ystrad Towi, from which place he continues his attacks upon the English; but, in 1122, concludes a peace with King Henry by which the latter cedes to Gruffydd much of his father's territory, to be held free, by homage and fealty, only.
1135-6: King Stephen summons Gruffydd to London to answer charges against the king's peace; but Gruffydd treats the summons with contempt, and proceeds to North Wales to procure assistance from Gruffydd ap Cynan, to whom he has now become reconciled, and whose daughter he has married.
Gwellian, wife of Gruffydd and daughter of Gruffydd ap Cynan, during the prince's absence, leading her husband's troops against one Gruffydd ap Llewelyn, commanding for Maurice de Londres, is defeated, captured, and beheaded on the field of battle. Morgan, one of Prince Gruffydd sons, is slain, and Maelgwn, another son, made prisoner. On both sides 516 men were slain, and their bodies left on the field to be devoured by wolves.
1136: Prince Gruffydd and the other chieftains now attack the Lords Marchers and the English and Fleming residents so that the execution of Gwenllian "was followed with a vast destruction of churches, towns, growing crops and cattle, the buring of castles and other forified places, and the slaughter, dispersion, and sale into foreign parts, of innumerable men, both rich and poor". March and April, 1136. Soon after this Gruffydd, assisted by the brothers of Gwenllian, and a majority of the chieftains of South Wales, subdued the entire country (part of South Wales) as far as Cardigan, driving out the English and Flemings; and replaced the old inhabitants on their lands, 1136.
1136: Gruffydd fights the battle of Cardigan, in the second week in October, and defeats the entire combined forces of the English and Flemings in Wales and on the Marches, commanded by Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, Robert Fitz-Martyn, Pain Fritz-John, and the sons of Gerald. "The slaughter of human life was so great that, besides the men who were led away into captivity, there remainded 10,000 catured women, whose husbands and little ones had been partly drowned in the water, partly consumed in the flames, partly slain with the sword". The English indeed were utterly routed, and Gruffydd immediately pursued his advantage by conquering all of Pembrokeshire.
Prince Gruffydd ap Rhys, having completed the conquest of Cardigan, and thus regained most of the ancient possessions of his ancestors, gave a grand festival at his palace in Ystrad Towi (Dinefwr, or Dynevor, castle) to which he invited all the princes and nobles of Wales and the Marches.
For the entertainment of the guests he assembled the sages of the country, whom he appointed to hold disputations; and he brought together the chief bards and musicians of every district to display their skill in vocal and instrumental music. To these were added scenic representations, feats of skill, and athletic sports. This festival continued forty days, after which the guests were dismissed and the bards and players liberally rewarded according to their deserts". This was about the beginning of the year 1137. Gruffydd, after this, applied himself to new regulations of government, and the revision of the laws.
Prince Gruffydd ap Rhys died about April or May 1137, having according to Florence of Worcester, been murdered by his (second) wife. He married first Gwenllian, dau. of Gruffydd ap Cynan.

[NI2157] Eldest son of Tewdwr ap Cadell. He was born in 997 and is stated to have been a mere child at the time of his father's death and to have been brought up in Brittany, to which place his father had probably fled, to escape the violence of his kinsman. Some accounts state, however, that his father fell in Wales, and that Rhys was sent to Brittany for safety, where he remained for many years until he returned to claim the sovereignty of South Wales, which was not, by all accounts, until he was seventy-nine or eighty years old.
"Rees the sonn of Tehodor as right inheritour to the kingdome of South Wales claimed the same, and the people received him with much joie, and made him their Prince.
"In him the legal succession was restored; he was moreover the choice of the people".
"Upon the overthrow of this Rhys (ap Owain), his kinsman Rhys ap Tewdwr, a lineal descendant of Rhodri Mawr, succedded to Deheubarth (South Wales) without any opposition of which evidence is handed down"
"According to Robert Vaughan of Hengwrt the immediate territories of this prince...consisted only of the present counties of Cardigan and Caermarthen; as Pembroke, Breicheiniog, Gwent and Gleguising (or Herefordshire) were governed by their several reguli. There can be but little doubt, however, that all these acknowledged the sovereign authority of the superior prince of South Wales.
1080 Rhys joins Gruffydd ap Cynan at St. Davids, and they defeat Trahaiain, Prince of North Wales and his allies at the battle of Mynydd Carn. The biographer of Gruffydd says that rhys did homage to Gruffydd on this occasion, and that Rhys promised him half of his dominions, but this is questionable. Rhys after the battle, withdrew, fearing treachery from his ally, and Gruffydd sent his Danish and Irish mercenaries to ravish his territory. After which Gruffydd marched to Powys, where he slaughtered all of the male inhabitants he encountered and carried their wives and the maidens into captivity. Mynydd Carn is in South Cardiganshire.
For his Herefordshire lands in the province of Arcenefelde, Rhys, under the designation of "Riset de Wales" paid William the Conqueror and annual tributle of 40 lbs.
1081 Rhys does homage to King William, at St. Davids.
1087 Attacked by the sons of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Prince of Powys, defeated and escapes to Ireland.
1089 Rhys recruits an army of Irish mercenaries, returns to South Wales, defeats the enemy at Llych Crei, and recovers his county.
"Rhys was evidently a wealthy chieftain, for the gifts he gave to his Irish mercenaries were so large as to attract special attention.
Phys ap Tewdwr was slain in battle near the Castle of Brecknock, in 1093. He was most historians agree, about 96 years of age at the time of his death.
Rhys married several times; his last wife, to whom he was wedded when he was about 65 to 70 years old or more, being Gwladys, daughter and heiress of Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn of Powys. Rhiwallon was slain at Mechain, 1068.

[NI2158] Sometimes called Tewdwr Mawr; but the epithet "Mawr" (great) may have also been applied to his uncle, Tewdwr ap Einion who was slain in 993.
Tewdwr ap Cadell was living about the year 997, and is said to have been slain soon after that date, apparently in Brittany, where he probably married, and where his son, Rhys, is traditionally said to have lived almost all his life.

[NI2159] Cadell was at the battle of Llangwm, 993, and was probably there slain with his brother. This battle was fought in Denbighshire, six miles from Corwen (in Merionethshire) between Maredydd ap Owain ap Howel Dda, and the rebel chieftain, Idwal ap Meurig.
(Giraldus de Barri, from whose writings we correct a later and erroneous statement, but who, in one paragraph makes Tewdwr, father of Rhys ap Tewdwr, son instead of grandson, of Einion ap Owain, was the fourth son of William de Barri, by his second wife, daughter of Nest, dau. of rhys ap Tewdwr, and was, therefore, great great grandson to Tewdwr ap Cadell ap Einion ap Owain ap Howel Dda, whose birth and ancestry, from actual records which he examined. Giraldus was born in 1147, one hundred and fifty four years after the probable date of Cadell's death. He was made Archdeacon of Brecknock, in 1175. In 1188 he accompanied Archbishop Baldwin, who came into South Wales to preach a crusade. The Archbishop and Giraldus were entertained by the "Lord" Rhys, Prince of South Wales and cousin to the latter. Whilst the guest of Rhys, Giraldus examined, it appears, the ancient archives relating to the family history of the princes of South Wales, and copied therefrom much information which he records. Among other things he says that the genealogy of the princes was preserved in books and that they traced their descent from Beli Mawr, otherwise Cunebelinos. But he adds that as long pedigrees may appear trifling they are omitted.

[NI2160] Eldest son of Owain ap Howel Dda, by his first wife. Einion commanded his father's troops.
967 Places Gower under tribute to his father.
981 Defeats the Danes under the famous Godrid, at Caer Faes, in the parish of Llanwenog, Cardiganshire. 981-2 Defeats the English. Slain at the battle of Pen Coed Colwyn 982-3.
982 The gentleman of Gwentland rebelled against their prince, and cruelly slew Einion, the son of Owen, which came thither to appease them. The "Brutt" places his death in 983.
Einion is spoken of as a young man of high promise and a leader of great judgement and personal bravery. A worthie and noble gentleman, who did manie notable acts in his fathers time. Einion is said to have married Nest, dau. of the Saxon Earl of Devonshire.

[NI2161] Eldest son of Howel Dda. Owain and three of his brothers, Dyfnwal, Rhodri, and Eadwyne succeeded jointly to the over-lordship of Deheubarth, or South Wales (excepting Glamorgan) upon the death of Howel Dda their father. But Ieuaf and Iago, sons of Idwal Voel, seized the government of Gwynedd, or North Wales.
950 Ieuaf and Iago attack Owain and his brothers and defeat them.
950 Ieuaf and Iago again attack Owain, but "Owen, Prince of Ceredigion (cardigan) collected an army against them, and followed them back to Gwynedd so closely that many of them were drowned in the river Dyvi.
951 Owen ap Howel Dda led an army into Gwynedd, and then the action of Aberconwy took place, in which such a slaughter was made, that both parties were obliged to retreat from losses they sustained in that battle. This was the battle of Llanrwst.
951-2 Dyfnwal, Rhodri, and Eadwyne, brothers of Owain, die and Owain becomes sole prince of South Wales.
953 Owain is again attacked by Ieuaf and Idwal, but defeats them with fearful loss.
954-5 Owain defeated and driven from his government. Ieuaf and Idwal "held the kingdom of Dinefwr for several years".
955 The Saxons, under Alvryd, invade North Wales, and Iago seizes his brother, Ieuaf and pulls out his eyes. Owain, taking advantage of the opportunity, recovers his territory.
962 Pays a tribute of 300 wolves heads to Eadgar, King of England.
987 Owain, Prince of South Wales dies.
The name of Owains first wife is unknown. He married, secondly, Angharad, daughter and heiress of Llewelyn ap Merfy ap Rhodri Mawr.

[NI2162] GSON OF ANARAWD AP RHODRI MAWR. IN 928 WENT TO ROME ON PILGRIMAGE. WAS COUSIN TO IDWAL OF GWYNEDD. RULED KINGDOM OF DEHEUBARTH IN SOUTH WALES.
Eldest son of Cadell, succeeded to his father's government in South Wales and Powys, and on the death of his cousin, Idwal Voel, in 943, he acquired that of North Wales, so that at first he is called "King of Deheubarth", and afterwards "King of the Welsh".
Howel was over-lord of the smaller principalities, or as they were called, kingdoms, of Gwent Dyfed, Breicheiniog, Buallt, Gleguising, and probably others. He does not appear, however, to have retained Glamorgan, although he attempted to do so. He was under-king to the Saxon monarchs.
922 Howel does homage to Eadward the Elder.
926 Does homage to Ethelstan, at Hereford.
926-28 Makes a pilgrimage to Rome.

Attends various Witenagemots, or Parliaments of his English over-lords, 936-949.
Howel and Morgan, the latter called "King" of Glamorgan, are parties to an Arbitration before Eadward the Elder concerning the districts of Ystradyew and Ewyas, and decided against Howel.
After North Wales came under his rule, in 943, Howel called together the chief men of Wales and formulated new laws for the government of the country, known as the "Laws of Howel Dda", and which, with some slight changes, continued partly in force until Henry VIII.
Howel, gor his godlie behaviour, discreet and just rule was beloved of men.
Howel dies: His death, says Powel, "was sore bewailed of all men, for he was a prince that loved peace and good order, and that feared God. Howel Dda is said to have married, first, Sain, daughter of the Duke of Cornwall. He is stated to have married secondly, Afandreg, daughter of Cynyr Fychan ap Cynyr Fawr of Arfon. He married, also, Elen (died 943), daughter of Loumarch (Llywarch) ap Hymeid, King of Dyfed. This Hymeid, "with all the inhabitants of Demetia, compelled by the violence of Rhodri's six sons, submitted to Elfred".
There is some uncertainty, from conflicting statements, as to the maternity of Howel Dda's children, and the following order is simply an arbitrary one, except that Owain was certainly the eldest, and it appears that his mother was Elen, seemingly the third wife of Howel. If, therefore any of Howel's children, as enumerated, were by the two first women named, they were, doubtless, by marriages disallowed.

[NI2176] CASTLES AT CRICCIETH, EWLOE, DOLWYDDELAN, DOLFORWYN (GWYNEDD).

[NI2181] Grandson of Llywelyn the great. In 1255 defeated his brothers Owain & Dafydd in Battle of Bryn Derwin.

[NI2188] Prince of South Wales, called the "Lord Rhys". He succeeded his father, Gruffydd ap Rhys in 1137.
1145: Rhys rebels against the English, re-takes Dinefwr Castle which they had seized, and the castles of Carmarthen and Llanstephen.
1147: Takes the Castle of Gwys.
1150: Takes the castle of Llanrhystyd (Dinerth) by storm, and puts the garrison to death; seizes the Castles of Ystrad Meurig and others, and retires to the Vale of Towi, having won all of Ceredigion.
1153: Takes the castle of Aberllychwyr, in Gower, and demolishes it, burns that of Penwedig, called Castle Gwalter, at Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn, that of Llanfihangel, in Pengwern, and that of Tenby, in Dyfed, by a night assault.
1154-5: Takes and demolishes Aberafon Castle, called Castle Humphrey, and those of Aberdyfi, Dieir, and Llanrhystyd.
1155: Rebuilds Aberdyfi Castle, and others; storms and captures the very stron castle of Llanymddyfri (Llandovery).
1157: Again takes the castle of Llanymddyfri.
1158: Rhys does homage at Woodstock to King Henry, who complets him to give 25 hostages, including two of his own sons.
1159: Rhys besieges Carmarthen, but unsuccessfully.
1161: Henry II, marches against Rhys, in person, and the latter surrenders, and is sent to prison in England.
1163-4: Released from prison, upon which he does homage to the king and gives hostages (Bartholomaei Cotton "Historia Agnlicana"). After this Rhys again attacked the English and re-captured all of Ceredigion (Cardiganshire), 1164; and in the same year attacks Dyfed and murders all the Flemings found there.
1164: Rhys founds the Abbey of Strata Florida (Ystrad Fflur) for the monks of the Cistercian order, in Cardiganshire.
1164: Henry II attacks Owain Gwynedd, prince of Gwynedd and Rhys becomes Owain'a ally. Henry, defeated, causes the male hostages, sons of Rhys and others with 300 prisoners of war to be matilated, their eyes pulled out, their noses slit, and their ears cut off, and of those hostages who were maidents, he ordered their ears stuffed.
1165: Nov. 5th: Rhys takes the castle of Aberteifi, or Cardigan, and re-takes the most part of Caerdigion.
1165-6: Captures Cilgerran Castle.
1166: Defeats the English and Flemings near Cilgerran.
1167: Rhys, and the prince of North Wales, capture the castle of Rhuddlan, which they demolish, but afterwards rebuilt, and also take the castle of Prestatyn, and burn it.
1167-8: Builds the castle of Aberlynaun.
1168-9: Rhys concludes a peace with the king of England.
1171: Engages in other attacks upon the English, and attacks Gwynedd and Powysland.
1171: Sept. 8: Surrenders, upon summons, to Henry II., at Cardiff, does homage, and is released after promising the king 300 horses, 4,000 oxen, and 24 hostages.
1171; Oct. 11: The king enters Pembrokeshire, and grants Rhys Ceredigion (Cardigan), Ystrad Towi, Arwystli, and Elvael. Rhys rebuilds the castle of Cardigan, and about this time is appointed the king's Justiciary for South Wales.
1173: Confers with Henry II at Pembroke Castle, returns to Cardigan to collect horses for the king, and has another interview with him the following Easter. He supports the king against Prince Henry.
1174: Summoned to serve in England against the Earl of Derby. At the seige of Tutbury, in the king's service 1175.
1175: July 29: A commissioner for a peace between England and Wales.
1176: Prince Rhys ap Gruffydd holds a great festival at his castle of Cardigan at christmas.
1177: Summoned to attend the Parliament held at Oxford.
1177: Attacks the Normans in Maelienydd (Melenyeth) and builds the castle of Rhaiadr Gwy.
1178: Rhys is attacked by the sons of Gruffydd ap Cynan of North Wales but defeats them with great slaughter.
1181-2: Engages in various quarrels with his English neighbours.
1184: Rhys grnts a charter to Strata Florida Abbey, which is witnessed in the Church of St. Bridget at Rhaiadr, Radnor, by Gruffydd, Rhys, and Maredydd, sons of Rhys.
Founds the Abbey of Tallagh, or Talley, in Carmarthenshire. Rhys was also benefactor and patron to several other religious Houses and Churches including the Cathedral of St. Davids.
1184: Rhys again revolts against the English; but has a truce with the king, and a conference at Worcester, under safe conduct. Peace is concluded, 1185, and Rhys raises a body of Welsh infantry for the king for service in the Frence Wars 1185.
1188: Archbishop Baldwin and Giraldus, the Archdeacon, preach a crusade in South Wales, and are magnificently entertained by the "Lord Rhys" at Cardigan, and other places.
1189: Rhys does homage to Richard I, at Oxford, and considering himself insulted because the king did not receive him personally, revolts and takes Carnwyllion, and several castles in Dyfed.
1189; Dec: Besieges Carmarthen, at Chrismas, and captures the castles of St. Clare, Abercoran and Llanstephen.
1190: Rebuilds Kidwelly Castle.
1191; Aug. 15: (The day of the Assumption of St. Mary). Rhys retakes Dinefwr Castle.
1194-5: Taken prisoner by his sons, Howel and Maelgwn, but escaping soon afterward re-takes the castle of Dinefwr which Maelgwn has seized. Upon his release Rhys again makes war upon the English, 1195; but De Broase wins the castle of St. Clare, held by Howel Sais ap Rhys, and in the same year, rhys and Meredydd, sons of Rhys, revolt against thier father and take the castle of Llanynddyfri.
1196: Rhys now musters a great army and wins the castle and town of Carmarthen, and subdues his rebellious sons.
1196-7: Captures Clun and Radnor Castles, and defeats Roger de Mortimer and Hugh de Saye; storms and takes Payne Castle, in Elvael, but restores it to William de Broase, whose daughter has married his son Gruffydd ap Rhys.
1197: Rhys, having ordered his sons to drag Peter de Leia, Bishop of St. Davids, out of bed and march him half clothed through the woods at night to Dinefwr (Dynevor) as a punishment for some insolence shown him, and refusing any apology or satisfaction to the bishop, is excommunicated.
1197: April 24: Rhys dies shortly after, of the pleague, whilst still under the ban of excommunication; but, through the entreaty of some of his sons who suffered penance for him, this was removed, although not before his decomposed body had been scourged, and he was buried in St. David's Cathedral Church.
Notwith standing his continuous military operations, Rhys was much concerned with the revision of the laws of Wales, and the thireeenth century MS. of the Demetian Code makes mention of alterations and additions by Lord Rhys ap Gruffydd, who flourished from 1137 to 1197.
"Lord Rhys" is said to have possessed an exceedingly violent temper, and when angry beat his servants (bondsmen) and "hung his dogs", indiscriminately.
Rhys ap Gruffydd married Gwenllian, dau. of Madog ap Maredydd, Prince of Powys. He also, at various times, formed other alliances under the laws and customs of Wales, the children by such unions being, according to the said written laws, heirs equally with the other children, not only to their father's lands, but also, in some cases, to his title. The legitimacy of the issue of such by the Church of Wales, and when judged by the Welsh law, by the Crown of England, until the statute of Rhuddlan disinherited children so born after the date thereof.

[NI2197] Third son, by Gwenllian, of Rhys ap Gruffydd, was born circa 1150. According to the custom of gavelkind he succeeded to a large portion of his father's dominions, including the castle of Dinefwr; but his elder brother, Gruffydd, assumed the title of Prince of South Wales. The following particulars concerning him unless otherwise specified, are from the authorities cited in re his father. Rhys Gryg (or Grig) is variously styled Rhys Grug and Rhys Vychan (or Fychan) (i.e. junior).

1184: Rhys witnesses his father's Charter to Strata Florida.
1195: Revolts against his father, but captured and imprisoned.
1198: Takes Dinefwr (Dynevor) Castle, which had fallen into the hands of the English.
Storms and takes Llychwein (Llychwyr) Castle, with the assistance of the English, and puts the garrison to the sword, 1205 and in 1207, takes Llangadoc Castle (21 miles E.N.E. from Carmarthen.
1209: Gruffydd opposes the King of England (John), who advances against him in person, and Rhys surrenders in the following year (1210). Is released.
1210: Defeats his brother, Maelgwn, in battle, and in the same year is summoned by King John to serve against Prince Llewelyn. In the following year joins the king in another expedition against the same prince (1211).
1212-3: Writ of King John to Goulk, Steward of Cardiff, Warden of the Marches, and to the Steward of Hereford, commanding them to take away from Rhys Fychan, by some called Res Grug, all of Ystradtywy. Dinefwr Castle was captured by his nephew Rhys ap Gruffydd, with the aid of the English the same year.
1214: Rhys Gryg takes the Castle of Llanymddfri; is taken prisoner at Carmarthen; but escapes.
1214: Joins in an assault on Caerfyrddin Castle, which he destroys; takes others on Christmas Eve, and on St. Stephen's Day captures Aberteifi and Cilgerran.
1216: Arbitration before Prince Llewelyn ap Aberteifi, regarding a partition of lands. Rhys Gryg gets the castle of Dinefwr and three cantrefs.
1217: Demolishes Gower Castle.
1219: Rhys Gryg marries Joane, daughter Richard de Clare.
1220-1: Maredydd, son of Rhys Gryg and Joane de Clare his wife is born.
1221: Rhys Gryg joins the Earl of Pembroke against Prince Llewelyn; but is defeated and again compelled to do homage to that prince.
1222: Composition of claim of Gervase, Bishop of St. David's against Res ap Res (i.e. Rhys Gryg, for certain lands, by which the said Res and Mareduch (i.e. Maredydd) his son and heir (then an infant) acknowledge the right of the Bishop and the Church of St. David's to all of the lands claimed, and the said Res and his sons (ie. by former wives) surrender all the said lands to the bishop receiving them back again to hold as vassals of the Bishop of St. David's at an annual rent of one lance on the Feast of St. John the Baptist, and military service in the Bishop's army in time of war, at the summons of the said bishop.
1223; Sept. 21: Rhys Gryg does homage to Henry III., and the king restores to him those lands which had been taken from him.
1227: Rhys Gryg is taken prisoner by his son Rhys Vychan, alias Rhys Mechyll at Llanarth, and forced to surrender Llanymddfri Castle, and the lands appertinant thereto, to the said Rhys Vychan (or Fychan).
(From the above notes (under 1219 to 1227) it is clear either that Joane was the first wedded wife of Rhys Gryg or that an earlier marriage had been disallowed by the Pope, in order that the eldest son of Joane de Clare might inherit the entire vast estate. The evidence is in favour of the latter supposition. It appears that Rhys Gryg, having at about the age of 70 years, married the dau. of a Norman earl, is persuaded to ignore the rights of his elder sons, and to make his youngest, and according to English law, only legitimate son, Maredydd, his sole heir. To strengthen his position Rhys makes a peace with Henry III., and does homage to him as a baron of England, thus endeavouring to place himself under English law. It will be noted that in the composition with the Bishop of St. David's, above cited, Maredydd is named as "son and heir," but as the other "sons" are also included, it is plain that the bishop was protecting himself under both English and Welsh laws. Rhys Vychan (or Mechyll), eldest son of Rhys Gryg, and at this time about 50 or more years old, learning of his father's intention to repudiate the ancient laws of Wales, and annul the rights of his (Rhys Vychan's) brothers and himself under an earlier alliance, seizes him and compels him to settle certain estates upon them.
1231; Nov. 30: Rhys Gryg is included in a temporary peace between England and Wales, being on the side of Llewelyn, so that prior to this he had again been in arms against the English.
1233: Rhys joins the rebel barons Richard Marshall, Earl of Pemborke, and Hubert de Burgh, and takes the castles of Cardiff, Aberegavenny, Pencelly, Blaenfyni, and Bwich y Dinas.
1233: Rhys Gryg is wounded at the seige of Carmarthen and taken to his Castle of Dinefwr (Dynevor) in Llandeilo Vawr, where, shortly after, he dies of his wounds and is buried at St. David's 1233.

[NI2198] Maelgwn (by Gwerfyl, daughter of Llewelyn ap Rhys ap Wardaf Frych). Confirmation charter to the Abbey of Strata Florida by Mailgun fil. Resi principis South Wall, 11 Kl' Feb. 1198. Maelgwn acquired a considerable portion of his father's possessions, and became a renouwned soldier. For particulars concerning his life, see Bridgeman's Princes of South Wales."

[NI2199] Maredydd, "gethin" called lord of Llanymddyfri; slain by the Englishmen of Kidwelly at Carnwyllaon, (Carnnyllion), 2 July 1201 (St. Swithin's Day), and was bruied in St. Mary's Church, Kydwelly.

[NI2226] Seized the throne of Gwynedd in 1018. In 1039, Gwynedd and Powys came into his possession after he had killed Iago ap Idwal the Great-Grandson of Idwal ap Anarawd.

[NI2259] He placed to tame the Picts of Galloway and rule the Goidels of Duvnonia, now Aryshire.

[NI2287] Gwrgan ap Meurig was the last independent King of Seisyllwg. Upon his death in 872, his kingdom was swallowed up amid the semi-united Wales of his brother-in
law, Rhodri Mawr (the great).

[NI2297] Tudwal, King of Dyfed; he was wounded in the knee by the Saxon king Edwal, at the battle of Rhodri's Revenge and afterwards became Chief Justice of Gwynedd.

[NI2321]

[NI2331] UPON THE DEATH OF MADOG, OWAIN GWYNEDD ATTACKED POWYS AND TOOK OVER AS RULER.

[NI2348] COUSIN OF ST. ODOCEUS AND BISHOP OF LLANDAFF 512 TO 566.

[NI2359] Nest (called also Annes, i.e. Annest, and Gwenllian) confused in some pedigrees with her sister, wife of Ednyved Fychan (or Vychan); she married Rhodri, younger son of Owain Gwynedd, prince of North Wales. Rhodri was living in 1176 and was ancestor to the Wynns of Gwydir and Anwyl families. "History of the Gwydir Family, Wynn; Bridgeman.

[NI2376] Cadell wounded by the English whilst hunting in Dyfed, 1151-2. His wounds incapacitating him for further active service in the field, he went on a pilgrimage to Rome 1156 and died 1175.

[NI2389] Rhys Mechyll, eldest son of Rhys Gryg, called also Rhys Vychan, or junior, as in the case of his father. He was born, doubtless, when his father was quite young. (At this time, both in England and Wales, youths were married when only fourteen years old or before. In Wales a son came of age under the ancient laws at fourteen years, so that there is a great difference between his age and that of his half-brothers Maredydd and Howel, who were born when Rhys Gryg was about 70 years old.
Rhys Mechyll inherited, as his portion of his father's estates, Dinefwr (or Dynevor) Castle and the greater part of the Cantref Mawr, and he also appears to have continued to hold Llanymddyfri Castle, which, in 1727, he had forced his father to cede to him.
1227: Rhys Mechyll takes his father prisoner at Llanarth, and compels him to grant him the Castle of Llanymddyfri and land appertainant thereto.
7 Hen. III. The king sends his letter to Res Vychan (Mechyll), son of Res Grig, advising him that Res Grig (the father) having done homage to him, must be molested.
Rhys Mechyll died 1244. He married a daughter of Lord Croft, of Croft Cstle, Herefordshire.

[NI2562] SOLD HIS LANDS AND TENEM IN KEVEN Y RHOS CALLED LLAWEGROS, TYDDYN EIONION GRYC AND DIVERS OTHER LANDS IN ESTIMANER AND CAME TO DWELL TO TALYBONT. HE LIVED IN THE DAYES OF KING HENRY VI AND WAS OF THE GRAND JURY FOR SAID COUNTY IN A SESSIONS KEPT AT CAERNARVON BEFORE THOS. STANTLEY, JUSTICE OF NORTH WALES IN THE 32ND YEAR OF THE SAID KING.

[NI2581] Rhys Vychan (or Fychan), eldest son of Rhys Mechyll lord of Dinefwr.
1244: Rhys Vychan attacks the English.
1245; Jan. 6:, The sons of Res Wachan (wiz. Rhys Vychan or Mechyll) were summoned by King Henry III., with the other barons of South Wales, to appear at the Court of Westminster on the morrow of Ash Wednesday, to answer for their transgressions against the king's peace, and on 20 August following the king took the homage of Res, the son of Res Wahan, at Woodstock, and because the said Res and his brothers had returned to the king's peace, the king lieges are commanded to suffer the said Res and his brothers to pase hither and thither freely at their will.
1245: Rhys Vychan captures the Castle of Carregcennan (Caercynan) which his mother had surrendered to the English, out of the ill will she bore her son.
Takes possession of the lands of Iscennen, which would seem to have been the inheritance of his uncle, Maredydd ap Rhys Gryg.
1252: Rhys Vychan, son of Res Vaphan, gives the king 20 marks to hold the same liberties and customs for his lands in Keyrmardin, as he and his ancestors had held in the time of Llewelyn, formerly Prince of Wales.
1256: Ejected from his lands by Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Wales, and goes over to the English, on that account; but, soon after again joins Llewelyn. In the same year 1256, Maredydd ap Rhys Gryg breaks faith with Prince Llewelyn and goes over to the king, who concedes him all the lands which he then held, as well as the lands of his nephew, Rhys Vychan, namely Mabuderith (Meynaur), Mabelneu, Meynau Teylau, Ketheynauth and Meynaur filiorum Seysild with the Castles of Dinefwr and Karrekemien, with all their appurtenances for ever.
But the lands of Rhys Vychan which were thus granted by the king to Maredydd as escheats to the Crown, nevertheless remained in Rhys Vychan's possession, and were, at his death, transmitted to his sons. After the peace of 1267, a settlement as to the above lands was effected between Rhys Vychan and Maredydd.
1258; March 8: Rhys Vychan is named in a compact with the Scots.
1271: On Octave of the Feast of St. Lawrence (17 Aug. 1271) died Res Vychan ap Res Mechyll ap Res Grig in his Castle of Dynevor, and was buried at Tal y Lychau.
He was buried at the Abbey of Tal y Llchau (now Talley) 7 1/2 miles from Llandeilo Vawr, which was founded by his ancestor, Rhys ap Gruffydd in 1197, and to which he was a benefactor. The remains of this Abbey, although partly demolished to rebuild the Church (St. Michael's) in 1773, and still considerable.
It would appear that Rhys Vychan was twice married, viz. first to Margaret, dau. of Gruffydd, and secondly, to Gwladys, dau. of Gruffydd ap Llewelyn, and sister to Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Wales. The latter wife died 1261. Both of his wives, doubtless, were buried at Tal y Llychau Abbey. It is uncertain which wife was the mother of his children.
There were doubtless other children who died in infancy.

[NI2582] Rhys Wendot, or Gloff (the lame), called also Rhys Vychan (or Fychan), eldest son of Rhys Vychan. He is designated lord of Dinefwr, Llandeilo Vawr and Ystrad Towi, and is stated to have also held the lordship of Cumutmaen, in Lleyn, Carnarvonshire, where his son was certainly seized of certain lands which Rhys Vychan, father of Rhys Wendot seems to have held in right of one of his wives. Rhys Wendot (or Gloff) divided his father's estates in South Wales with his brother, Llewelyn.
1277: Rhys joins Llewelyn against the king.
1277: Deserts Llewelyn and offers to do homage to Edward I.; but the king declines to accept his homage and retains him a prisoner, upon his surrender.
1277; June 5: Mandate to Payn de Cadurcis, Captain of the king's munitions in West Wales, to retain intire in the king's hands the castles Dinnevor, Karekenye and Lanedevery, but to permit the men of Rhys Vaghan to hold their lands and tenements as before. Dated at Windsor.
1277; July 1: The king receives the homage of Rhys at Worcester, and Rhys returns to South Wales on 10 October, following.
1277; Oct. 7: Safe conduct, until All Saint's Day, for Res Vaghan and Kanaan (Cynan) son of Mereduc (Maredydd), going with their horses, harness and men to their own parts. Given at Rhuddlan.
1278; Jan 10: Named by the king as "Res Vaghan" of Dehuberd" South Wales, in a letter to the King's Justices.
1279; Jan. 11: Rhys (Res) Vychan, or Wendot, receives the king's pardon to him and to his men, for transgressions of the king's peace. At this time he was reinstated in a portion of his inheritance, which the king had taken from him; but Dinefwr had been ceded to the Crown, and granted to Rhys ap Maredydd.
1282: Rhys joins the revolt of Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. Sends a memorial to the king through Llewelyn, of injuries done him by the king's subjects, 11 Nov. 1282.
(Prince Llewelyn is slain near Pont Orewyn, in Buallt, 10 Dec. 1282, and Prince David, Llewelyn's brother, is taken prisioner, 12 June 1283.
1283: Rhys holds out against the king. This "Res a Vawhan, the richest and most powerful of the Welsh chieftains, who had opposed the King during the whole period of the war, and who, moving from province to province, had committed great slaughter and ferocisously devastated the King's lands, being discouraged in spirit when he heard of the death of Llewelyn and the capture of David, and being himself closely pursued by the King's forces, at length repaired with his accomplices to Humfrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and surrendered to him". He was sent to London in fetters, and confined in the Tower, where he afterwards died (date unknown), and his lands were forfeited to the Crown.
Rhys Vychan is stated by Dwnn to have married Gwervyl, (Gwerfyl) verch Maelgwn ap Cadwall ap Madg ap Ierwth ap Cadw ap Elystan Glodryth. "Ierwth is a mistake for Idnerth. Elystan Glodryth was a chieftain, or prince, of Fferllys, a district in Herefordshire. He is the reputed founder of the Abbey of St. Mary's at CwmHir, Radnorshire, and of three Churches dedicated to St. Michael, wiz. in Kerry, Kenennllys and Builth. According to credible authority he died in 1067, and was buried at Hereford. ("Montgomeryshire Collections,"). Madog ap Idnerth, a lord of Maelienydd, was one of those who in 1136, took part with Prince Gruffydd ap Rhys and the sons of Prince Gruffydd ap Cynan, in the attack upon the English in Cardiganshire, in which the latter were defeated with terrible slaughter. Madog died about 1141. He married Reinalt, daughter of Gruffydd ap Cynan, Prince of North Wales, and was therefore brother-in-law to Gruffydd ap Rhys, Prince of South Wales, his superior lord.
Cadwallon ap Madog, of Maelienydd, was a benefactor to the Abbey of Cwm Hir, in 1143. He opposed Henry II., and was present at the battle of Crogen, in 1165. According to Powel, the cantrefs of Arwystli and Elvael, with other districts, were granted by the king to Rhys ap Gruffydd, the "Lord Rhys" in 1171. In this case Cadwallon would continue to hold under Rhys, and accordingly, we find him doing homage with that prince, to the king at Gloucester, in 1175.
On 22 Sept. 1179, Cadwallon ap Madog was waylaid and murdered by retainers of Roger de Mortimer, in returning from the king's court, and whilst under the king's safe-conduct.
Cadwallon left two son, Maelgwn and Cadwallon. In 1193-4, these sons were acting in conjunction with the "Lord Rhys" against the English. Maelgwn died 1197. His brother, Cadwallon, died after 1193-4, leaving two sons, Cadwallon and Maelgwn, who, having been taken in rebellion, were both hanged by King John, at Bridgenorth, supposedly in 1212.
From the above it is certain that Rhys Vychan IV., alias Rhys Gloff, could not have married a daughter of Maelgwn ap Cadwallon, who was, as we have seen, hanged by King John, supposedly in 1212, unless indeed she was an infant at the time of her father's death. It is much more probable, in fact quite certain, that Gwerfyl was not the daughter, but grand-daughter of Maelgwn ap Cadwallon, and daughter of Maelgwn ap Maelgwn, alias Maelgwn Vychan.
This Maelgwn ap Maelgwn was a very important personage, holding extensive territories in Radnor, and was one of those Welsh lords who, on the morrow of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, (16 Aug. 1241), bound themselves by oath to be of the king's fealty.

[NI2583] Trahaiarn Goch, son of Madog Goch (or Madog ap Rhys). "History of Powys Fadog".
Trahaiarn (Trahairn, Trahearn), Goch is called in some pefigrees lord of Cymytmaen, in Lleyn, Carnarvonshire, and in others simply designated as "of Lleyn". It is evident from a survey made by the Crown in 1352 that he held considerable land in Cymytmaen, which, in the altter year was in the possession of his descendants.
He succeeded to his lands after 28 April 1292, in which year his father was alive.
1301; Jan. 28: Trahaiarn appears as father of Llewelyn ap Trahaiarn, pardoned with others, for outlawry (they were then in arms against the king) on condition that he surrender to Clifford goal before Easter.
1325: Named as father of David Goch of Cymytmaen, and then dead.
Trahaiarn Goch married Gwerfyl, daughter of Madog ap Meurig, descended from Elystan Glodryth, or Glodrudd.

[NI2584] Second son of Trahaiarn Goch. "History of Powys Fadog" vi., 232-4; Ministers' Accounts relating to Wales; Harl. MS 1974.
David Goch under the law of gavelkind, inherited one eighth part of his father's lands in Cymytmaen, wiz., parts of Bodreith (called Tref Baythain), Penllech, the Mills of Bodwda, Newith, and Vagheys, lands in Aberdaron and elsewhere.
1319; Jun. 6: Grant to David Goch, for life, on account of his good services to the late king (Edward I), of 60 shillings per annum, to be received at the hands of the Chamberlain at Kaernarvon (Carnarvon).
1325: Under the designation of "David Goch ap Trah'rn" he is called "firmar man ii Neugolf," farmer, or lessee, of the Crown manor of Neugolf in the hundred of Cymytmaen, in this year and is mentioned as being alive on Friday 9 Nov. 1329.
David Goch appears to have acquired the lands of Graianog, Uwch Gwafi, an estate at Novem Burgum, on the coast of Anglesey, and a mansion and lands in the vill of Rungdewar, in Efidnydd.
1344: David Goch does homage and fealty for his lands to the king at Carnarvon.
Towards the close of his life David Goch entered the Monastery of St. Mary, on Ynys Enlli, or Bardsey Isle, adjacent to his home, and assuming the religious habit, became Abbot of that House, where before 1352 he died, and was buried.
The Monastery of St. Mary, Ynys Enlli, "from the remotest period of antiquity, appears to have been the resort of devotees, who, retiring from the cares of this world sought an asylum here, where they passed the remainder of their lives."
David Goch married Mawd, daughter of David Lloyd, son of Llewelyn. The latter was son of David ap Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. David's mother was Joanna (or Joan) daughter of John, King of England.

[NI2585] Second son of David Goch, called of Penllech and Graianog.
1352: on the next Thursday after the Festival of St. James the Apostle. Ieuan ap David Goch is named as the second man on the jury for taking the extent of the hundred of Cymytmaen, at Nevyn.
1352: Ieuan ap David Goch and others were owners of the Wele Res ap Seisilth in the vill of Bodreeth ("called Trefa Baythain"), and parts of the mills of Bodwrda (in Aberdaron). Newith and Vagheys. He was also one of the heirs to the vill of Tyndowet (Tydweilliog), in Cymytmaen, and it would appear that he held land in Penllech, and was one-third owner of a mansion and lands (in common with his brothers) in the vill of Rungdewar, in Efionydd.
There are conflicting statements regarding the wife of Ieuan Goch, but there can be no doubt tht she was Efa, daughter of Einion ap Celynin, of Llwydiarth, in Montgomeryshire. This Einion, under the designation of "Anian ap Celynin" had a grant from John de Charleton, of Weston, Decollation of St. John the Baptist. 1340.

[NI2586] Madog (otherwise Madog ap Ieuan Goch, Madog Goch), eldest son of Ieuan Goch.
Named in the "Cevn Amwich" pedigree as Madg hynav gwyr yr Ysbyty; viz., "ancestor to the men of Yspytty (Yspytty Ieuan, or Evan)."
1352: The next Thursday after the Festival of St. James the Apostle. Madog Goch is the ninth man on the jury (of which his father is the second) for taking the extent of the hundred of Cymytmaen. At this time he was a very young man.
Named in a deed of Iorwerth ap Ithel Vychan for certain lands near Penllech. Dwnn's original MS has this entry opposite his definite statement that Madog was son of "Ivan Goch o Benllach" (Ieuan Goch of Penllech). Not (NOTE:) o weithred Ierwth ab Ithel Vyth yn gwerthu tir; i.e. "Out of a deed of Ierwerth ab Ithel Vychan for the sale of land."
The name of Madog's wife is not given in any pedigree of this family we have examined. It is most probable, however, that she was Alex, or Ales, one of the duaghters of Ieuan ap Madog Gwenwys, of Guilsfield, or Beechfield. Madog Gwenwys, otherwise Madog de Beechfield, was in the garrison of Caus Castle, Oct. 1266, and a juror of Worthyn Liberty, 1274, and first juror at the Assize of 1292. His son, Ieuan, married Gwenhwyfar verch Gruffydd ap Alo, which Gruffydd was living 10 Aug. 1309, at which time he was aged about 40 years or under.

[NI2598] Clydawc wounded in personal combat with his brother Meurig, 917. In 922 when Eadward the Elder had subdued all Mercia, Idwal, then prince of Gwynedd, together with Howel Dda and a welsh prince named Clydawc, received him as their lord.

[NI2634] Howel; he was in the prison of Ernulph (de Montgomery) son of Roger, lord of Castle Baldwin, "when King William had given (to Ernulph) a part of the territory of Res ap Tudor" but he subsequently escaped "in a mained state with broken limbs".

[NI2654] Gwenllian married Ednyfed Fychan, chief Counsellor to Llewelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales, 1194-1240, and also to his son Prince David. In letters patent dated at Shrewsbury, 17 Dec., 1232, Ednyfed is styled Idnevet Seneschallo Ipsius Lewelini; named as one of the arbitrators in a convention between Henry III and Prince David at Gloucester, on the next Tuesday before the Feast of St. Dunstan, 24 Hen. III. Ednyved Fychan was ancestor to the Royal House of Tudor. Baron of Brynvengle.

[NI2663] Morgan (by Nest, daughter of Caradog Fychan ap Caradog). He was one of the witnesses to the confirmation charter of Maelgwn ap Rhys to the Abbey of Strata Florida, 11 kl' Feb. 1198, and that of Maelgwn Vychan. Died in 1251, being very aged and having assumed the monastic habit, at Strata Florida, where he was buried.

[NI2666] Cynwrig (by Nest, dau. of Gruffydd Wynn ap Gwalchmai); he was one of the hostages given to Henry II, 1164-5 then aged 10 or 12 years, and died in Whiteland Abbey, 1237 having survived his mutilation 72 years.

[NI2667] Cynwrig (or Cyneuric). On the morning of leaving Strata Florida, the archbishop and Giraldus were met by this Cynwrig at the head of a body of light-armed youths. "This young man," writes Giraldus, "was of a fair complexion, with curled hair, tall and handsome, clothed only according to the custom of his country, with a thin cloak and inner garment, his legs and feet, regardless of thorns and thistles, were bare; a man not adoned by art but by nature; bearing in his presence an inate not acquired, dignity of manners."

[NI2668] Howel, called iddall, the blind, to distinguish him from his brothers of the same name; he is said to have been a hostage, and was blinded, but whether he was one of those delivered in 1164-5, to Henry II., in addition to Cynwrig and Maredydd, is uncertain. He may, like other of his kinsmen, had his eyes pulled out by some other chieftain, as this mode of punishment or revenge, was then very popular in Wales. He was, however, certainly blind, and this precludes the notion that he could have been confused with either of his brothers of the same name, who it is evident must have been possessed of their eyesight. Howel was living 1194, when, it is recorded, he was instrumental in obtaining the release of his father, who had been imprisoned by Howel's brothers, Maelgwn and Howel Sais.

[NI2671] Howel Sais (by Ysteder, dau. of Caradog ap Llowrodd). He had also been a hostage, probably one of the 24 given to Henry II, in 1171, and remained so long in England that he acquired the epithet of Sais, and he is stated to have held the lordship of St. Clare. Some military operations are credited to him in 1173, and later, 1189, was in command of St. Calir; he joined Maelgwn, his brother against his father, in 1194; but afterwards falling out with Maelgwn, the latter's men fell upon him and stabbed him at Cemes. He was conveyed to Strata Florida, and assumed the habit of a monk, and dying of his wounds soon after, was there buried 1204.

[NI2675] Maredydd (by Efa, dau. of David Fras (Vras) ap Rhydderch); he was Archdeacon of Cardigan, and died at the Church of Llandedr Tal Pont Stephan (now called Lampeter) and his body conveyed to St. Davids and buried by Iorwerth, the Bishop, near the grave of his father Rhys.

[NI2678] Maredydd "Iddall," the blind (by Gwyndyth, dau. of Cynddelw ap Brochmail, of Llangiwg, in Emlyn); one of the hostages delivered to Henry II., in 1164 and as well as his brother, Cynwrig, was mutilated, his eyes pulled out, his nose slit, and his ears cut off by order of that king. He bacame a monk and died 1239 at Whiteland Abbey, where he was buried.

[NI2714] Howel, pardoned, 7 Jan. 1278, for attacks on the English. Again revolts, and "Ohelo ap Res Crek" and his men declared felons and outlaws, and Howel's lands forfeited, 10 June 1280. Ancestor to a family in South Wales.

[NI2725] Madog Goch, son of Rhys Wendot, otherwise Rhys Gloff and Rhys Vychan.
Madog ap Res (Gloff) ap Res Vychan ap Res Mechyll ap Res Gryg, is named in MS pedigree by Robert Vaughan of Hengwrt.
Madoc ap Rhys Gloff is named in MS pedigree brought from Wales in 1698, by the Evans brothers of Gwynedd, Penna. (Evans MSS.; Parker Foulke MSS.,"Historical Collections of Gwynedd," H.M. Jenkins 1st ed., 214-15). Named as above in Tai Croeswn MS cited in "History of Powys Fadog," vi., 232-4. As Madog ap Res Gloff, he is mentioned in the pedigree under "Cevn Amwich," in Visitations of North Wales, Dwnn (Deputy Herald) dated 22 Sept., 1588, and in pedigree under "Graianog," dated 1602. In the two last pedigrees, however, the descent from the "Lord Rhys" is tentatively and incorrectly given.
Madog became seized, perhaps by enfeoffment by his father, of certain lands in the cymwd of Cymytmaen, in Lleyn. These lands comprised parts of the present parishes of Penllech, Aberdaron, and neighbourhood. It is claimed that he held the lordship of Cymytmaen, which statement seems borne out by various circumstances. That these lands had been part of the possessions of one Gruffydd, father of one of the wives of Rhys Vaughan, Madog's grandfather, seems certain.
Madog, according to tradition, fought under his father, in 1282 and it is conceivable that Edward I followed, in this instance, the same policy which he pursued in others, wiz., although punishing the great chieftains by death or imprisonment, and confiscation of their vast estates, yet, at the same time, he permitted their sons, upon their submission, to retain for their support inconsiderable properties which they had acquired previous to the war.
1292; April 28: Madog Goch does homage and fealty for his lands to the king, at Carnarvon.
Madog married Tanglwyst, daughter of Goronwy ap Einion ap Goronwy ap Rhys ap Caradog ap Iestyn ap Gwrgant, Prince of Glamorgan.

[NI2735] Pardon to Llewelyn ap Trahaiarn for outlawry, for non-appearance before the king to answer a plea of trespass of Roger de Mortuo Mari, on condition that they surrender to Clifford goal before Easter, and take their trail. Dated 28 Jan. 1301. David ap Llewelyn, the 2nd son of Llewelyn ap Trahaiarn, was 10th man on the jury for taking the extent of the hundred of Cymytmaen at Nevyn, on the next Thursday after the Festival of St. James the Apostle, 1352, and was ancestor to a family living at Llandygwydd.

[NI2736] Ieuan ap Llewelyn, the eldest son of Llewelyn ap Trahaiarn, was probably the father of Walter ap Ieuan ap Llewelyn, named as one of the grantors in a deed dated at Westminster, 1 Aug. 1362, Sir Gilbert Talbot to John, Earl of Lancaster, whereby the grantors, heirs of Llewelyn ap Rhys Vychan ap Rhys Mechyll ap Rhys Gryg, cede to the said Earl and Blanche his wife, the Castle of Carreckemyn, and comot of Iskennyn (Isgenen) together with the mills, parks..and "natives and their services".

[NI2753] He was apparently too old to march to Bosworth Field with Henry VII, but lent him his good grey horse.

[NI2754] He held, in or before 1352, 6 bovats of land in the vill of Bodreeth, and four bondsmen in the same vill, 1 bovat of land in the vill of Penthlagh (Penllech), one sixteenth of the mill of Bodreeth, and one third part of a messuage and lands in the vill of Rungdewar.
David Vaughan had four sons in the vill of Bodreeth, Griffuth (gruffydd), Duy, Ieuan Seys, Hoell (Howel) ap David and David Meryn; of whom the latter was dead in 1352 leaving two (infant) sons. Gruffydd Duy and Ieuan Seys were felons, and their interest in their father's lands and in the mill of Bodreeth had been forfieted for treason, and were in the hands of the Prince in the above year. (They appear to have been leaders in one of the insurrections of Owain Lawgoch, who set himself up as Prince of Wales on the strength of his descent from Owain Gwynedd.
This is an illustration of the results of the custom of gavel kind. It appears that Daavid Vaughan, who must have been dead by 1352, held less than 100 acres of free land in Cymytmaen, four slaves, part of a mill and one third of a messuage and lands in Efionydd.

[NI2756] It looks like David Goch's third son was identical with that Gruffydd ap David Goch who acquired lands in Penmachno, and whose effigy remains in Bettws y Coed Church, and that the latter, therefore, is not the same person as David, said to be illegitimate son of David, Prince of Wales, who was executed 1283, as generally supposed, and so stated in several pedigrees, but identical with David Goch of Penllech.

[NI2760] Maredydd, of Penllech. His son, Ieuan, of Penllech, had David Vaughan, of Penllech, who had Gruffydd ap David Vaughan, living at Michaelmas, 1481, ancestor of the Griffiths of Cevn.

[NI2761] Ancestor to the Carrogs of Lleyn. Carrog is in the parish of Aberdaron. I think that a number of the family were buried in this Church.

[NI2780] Cadwgan ap Ieuan ap Madog, of Kidwelli, near Carmarthen, South Wales. He married a gentlewoman of North Wales, ye daughter of dd ap Ieuan Vaun', of Gwythelvynydd in ye parish of Towny, one of ye greatest men in his countrey, & he sold his lands in Kidweli & came to live in North Wales to his wives' friends, where he bought lands in ye hundred of Talybont & Estimanner, & left ye same to Evan his son by his sayd wife. She was Gwenhwyfar, daughter of David ap Ieuan Vychan ap David Wyn Wydell ap Ednowain ap Bradwen, Lord of Talybont.

[NI2811] Rees Thomas will, Cardiff Records, Vol. III, Ch. V:
Listed in will: Anne Gwyne, aunt; Elyzabeth Gwyne, dau. of John Gwyne (illegitim); Katherynge Gwyne, dau. of John Gwyne (illegitim); Elyzabeth John (see Elyzabeth Gwyne); Katherynge John (see Katherynge Gwyne); Robert John; Johan Lovell, wife of Thomas Lovell; Anne Mathew, sister; George Mathew, knighte; Harry Mathew, gent; stepfather; Jenet Mathew, mother (remarried to Harry Mathew); katherynge mathew, sister; Wyllyam Mathew, esq, overseer; Maraduke Mathew, in debita petenda; Thomas Powell, overseer; Dauid ap Rees, dweller of cottage bequeathed; Wenllyan Yevan, wife of Morgan Yevan; in debita.

[NI2901] Gronoe Vaughan was ancestor to Owen Tudor, who married the widow of Henry V.

[NI3246] Edward Mathew of Sweldon, gent. died without issue, and mortgaged Sweldon, at Ceven Mably for 100 pounds and left it to pay his debt, and it never returned back to the right heir afterward.

[NI3823] "The Genealogies of Glamorgan": The Bassets, though doubtless a branch from the Norman stock spread very widely over England, have not a proven descent, and were certainly not seated at Beaupre before the reign of Edward I., though in the extent of the De Clare lands in 1264, Elias Basset held half a fee in the contiguous lordship of St. Hilary, and Thomas Basset held it about 1316. Elias Basset, however, in a document cited by Pole (Devon, p. 393), is called Lord of Beaupier in Wales. This connexion with Glamorgan was probably, direcly or indirectly, though the De Cardiffs.

[NI4075] Per notes of "Land of my Fathers" During the first decade of the wars, the Welshman on whom the bards concentrated their attention was William Herbert of Raglan, in Gwent. This cultured nationalist was the son of Gwladys, the daughter of Dafydd Gam. His father had been successful in business in London, a prototype of the modern London Welsh. His own name was Sir William ap Thomas, but Herbert was the name he have to his children. Herbert won great fame as a solider. After the Battle of Towton in 1461 he was made Justice of southern Wales, and it was he who was given the task of winning all Wales over to the Yorkist cause. He was exhorted by Guto'r Glyn and the other bards to concentrate on fighting for the freedom of Wales. Except for Northumberland, Wales was the only place where the Lancastrians were strong at that time, thanks to the efforts of Jasper Tudor. Herbert marched westwards in pursuit of them. The castles of Pembroke and Tenby capitulated easily, but Harlech was effectively defended for another seven years. In defending the castle Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Einion and the fifty men with him won great renown for themselves, an are immortalised in "Rhyfelgyrch Gwry Harlech', (The warson of the Men of Harlech).
From now on William Herbert was the chief advisor to the king, a sort of predecesor to Lloyd George. In 1466 his son William married the queen's sister. The following year Herbert was made Chief Justice of Wales, and in 1468 he became Earl of Pembroke. The Welsh bards were delighted. In proclaiming him leader of the nation, Guto'r Glyn calls him to unite all Wales under him, and to free it from the English.
Poor thing; they could not see that he was only using Wales for his own purpose in English politics - as the Tudors themselves did.
The glory of this Earl of Pembroke was short-lived, and it was only his fellow Welshmen who remained loyal to him when Warwick rebelled. He fought his last battle near Banbury on July 26, 1469. In a bloody fight his Welsh army was defeated. One hundred and sixty-eight prominent Welshmen were killed, the cream of the southern nobility. Herbert was taken prisoner and excuted.

[NI4297] Jenkin Kemeys, 1374, who, 22 Richard Ii., held Bekanslegh as a quarterfee of William, borhter and heir of Thomas, Earl Stafford. In 38-39 Henry VI., Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Bucks, was lord; but the tenant was Meyric ap Jorworth, who may have been a Kemeys

[NI4450] Jorworth, or Edward, De Kemeys, lord of Kemeys, a mesne manor held of the lords of Caerleon, and on their expiration in 1217, of the Mareschals Earls of Pembroke. He married Nest or Elizabeth, dau. of Andrew de Beauchamp and heir of her brother Andrew, who died about 1320. s.p. and probably heir of Began or Begansley, said to be a corruption of "Beauchamps ley". It is a manor held of the lords of Wentlloog as a quarter of a knight's fee. Began is below Cefn Mably, and a farm house is said to occupy the site of the old Kemeys residence, before their removal to Cefn Mably. The arms attributed to the lady who brought in Began are "Argent, 6 lozenges conjoined in bend gules. On a chief azure, 3 scallops argent." These, however, belong to the Gamages.

[NI4451] Witnessed a Mareschal charter to Tintern Abbey, was living 1234-41, and probably married a Welsh heiress.


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