Patrick Mullins I
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    Patrick Mullins I - North Carolina

       Patrick MULLINS most likely came out of Virginia to settle in north-central North Carolina.  It is this researcher’s belief that he was the son of Matthew MULLINS.  

        In the deed transactions for Patrick MULLINS, a lot of information can be gleaned:

  1. Earl Granville (John Carteret) gives 375 acres in Rowan County to Patrick MULLENS on March 15, 1756.  This grant was supposed to have been made in Orange County, but the land was in Rowan County.4  (The grant is described as “Both sides of the Haw River”.) 

  2. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 2, pg. 217, Oct. 15, 1757:  Patrick MULLINGS Sr. & wife Mary let Enoch Conly (both men planters of Rowan Co., NC.) have 120 acres on south side of Dan River, beginning on the south side of the river, for £10, witnessed by Avenstone Rogers, Thomas Mullin & Noble Lad & proved by the last named in Oct. 1857.  Enoch Conly, according to FHL was born about 1709 in, and had at least one daughter, Eleanor who was born about 1730 in NC.

  3. Rowan County, NC, Tax List, 1759- Patrick Mullin (no other data).

  4. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 5, pg. 361, May 12, 1763:  Enoch Conly of Halifax County, VA, - no wife - signs (lets) John Cox of Rowan County, NC, have 123(?) acres on the south side of Dan River, for £20, witnessed by Peter Perkins, Francis Cox & Samuel Ridgeway & proved in Oct. 1763 by John Frohock, C.C.  (Also on October 12, 1763, deed from Enoch Coneley to John Cox for 12 acres bought May 12, 1763, proved by Peter Perkins.  Fee £ ¾.)  Enoch Conly has moved to Virginia.

  5. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 6, pg. 495, July 16, 1766:  Patrick MULLINS Sr. - no wife signs - lets his son, Thomas MULLINS (Both of Rowan County, NC.) have 120 acres on the south side of Dan river above the upper Charaw Town next the dividing line of Enoch Conely, then up the river to Punchin Camp, for £50, witnessed by Hugh Dennum & Beverly (?) Watkins & John Moore & proved on Oct. 13, 1767.  (This is part of the Earl Granville Grant).

  6. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 6, pg. 493, Jan. 29, 1767:  Patrick MULLINGS - no wife signs - lets William Johnson (both of Rowan County, NC) have 70 acres on the north side of Dan River at the mouth of Blackeys Branch, for £30, witnessed by Hugh Dennam, William MULLINGS, and Thomas Rogers & proved in Oct. 1767.  (In notes: This is part of 320 acres that Earl Granville let MULLINGS have March 15, 1756.)

  7. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 6, pg. 492, Feb. 2, 1767:  Patrick MULLINGS - no wife signs - lets Moses Damron (both of Rotan County, NC) have 60 acres on the north side of Dan River at the mouth of Blackeys Branch & on lower side to Dan River at Punchin Camp & on up the river, for £35, witnessed by Thomas Rogers, William MULLINGS & Hugh Dennum & proved on October 13, 1767.  (Part of 325 acre grant from Earl Granville on Marcy 15, 1756.)

  8. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 6, pg. 491, August 14, 1767:  William Johnston - no wife signs - lets Moses Damron (both of Rowan County, NC) have 70 acres on the north side of Dan River, beginning at the mouth of Blackeys Branch on the upper side, going up it to a white oak & a black oak west to the said river, then down its various sourses to the beginning, for £35 current N.C. money, witnessed by Hugh Dennum & Noble Ladd & proved On October 12, 1767.  (In the notes it states that this was part of 340(?) acres from Earl Granville granted on March 15, 1756, but no deed was found.)

  9. Rowan County, NC, Deed book 6, pg. 494, Oct. 10, 1767:  John Cox - no wife - lets William MULLINGS (both of Rowan County, NC) have 120 acres on the south side of Dan River, for  £20, witnessed by Joel Walker, Jas. Coleman, & Chs. Gallaway, and proved in  Oct. 1767.  (October 14, 1767:  Deed by John Cox to William MULLINGS for 220(?) acres October 10, 1767, proved by Charles Galway.

  10. Surry County, Deed book A, NC, pg. 31, Dec. 31, 1770:  Moses Damron - no wife - signs (lets) Samuel Dunlap (both of Rowan County, NC) have 70 acres, in Rowan County, Blackeys Branch and on Dan River, for £50, witnessed by William MULLENS, Stephen Clayton, Jr. & Hugh Dennum & proved by the land named in Feb. 1773.  (This is part of the Earl Granville Grant).

  11. Surry County, Deed book A, pg. 98, Dec 13, 1770:  Moses Damron - no wife - signs over (lets) Hugh Dennum (both of Rowan County, NC) have 50 acres on the north side of Dann River above the upper Charraw Town next a Puncheon Camp on Blackeys Branch on to Dann River, for £20, witnessed by William MULLINS & Stephen Clayton, Jr., proved by the latter in Nov. 1774.  (This is part of the Earl Granville Grant).

  12. Surry County, Deed book A, pg. 71, March 16, 1773:  Thomas MULLINS (Elizabeth makes her mark) of Guilford County, NC, lets William Davis of Surry County, NC, have 120 acres on the south side of Dan River of upper Charraw Town next Enoch Conley & Indian Camp, for £120, witnessed by William Chambers & William MULLINS & proved by the latter in May 1774.  (This is the land which Earl Granville let Patrick MULLINS have & he as father of Thomas let him have on July 16, 1766 - see deed in Rowan County)

 

            In reviewing the above deed transactions a lot of information surfaces.  This land is obviously at the confluence of Blackies Branch and the Dan River.  Patrick’s deed transactions, first in Rowan County then Stokes County reflect the changing county lines.5  This particular spot is less than 5 miles from the present north-south county line dividing Stokes and Rockingham Counties.  Confusion is common in reviewing land ownership because of the changing boundaries.  Let’s try to explain the changing boundaries in North Carolina this way:

In 1752 Orange County was formed. 

In 1753 Rowan County was formed.  The north-south dividing line between the two was not exact and only lasted for 17 years.

In 1770 Guilford County was formed taking about ½ of its size from each of Rowan and Orange Counties.  This in effect deleted the old demarcation between Rowan and Orange. 

In 1770 Surry County was formed also taking the northeast part of Rowan, with Guilford becoming a neighbor to the east.

In 1770 Chatham County was formed occupying the southern portion of Orange County, with Guilford becoming a neighbor to the west.

In 1779 Randolph County was formed taking the entire bottom third of Guilford County. 

In 1785 Rockingham County was formed occupying the entire top third of Guilford County, and it borders Virginia

In 1789 Stokes County was formed out of the eastern part of Surry County, bordering on the western edge of Rockingham and Guilford Counties.

In 1849 Forsyth County was formed from the southern boundary of Stokes County.

Therefore, the land described in the various deeds for Patrick MULLINS, and his children William and Thomas I, is land currently situated in Stokes County.  Also the land is approximately 360-370 acres.  After Patrick MULLINS’ grant of 375 acres the following sales take place on the original land:

  1. 120 acres to Enoch Conly then John Cox then to William MULLINS (his son).

  2. 120 acres to Thomas MULLINS I (his son) then to William Davis.

  3. 70 acres to William Johnson then to Moses Damron then to Samuel Dunlap.

  4. 60 acres to Moses Damron then 50 acres to Hugh Dennum.

        This totals 370 or 360 acres as you choose, which shows how boundaries during the Colonial Period were not exact, and our Patrick may not have grabbed enough land, for his grant of 375 acres. 

        Also referred to in several documents were “Charaw Town” or “Charraw Town”, as well as Indian Camp.  In Stokes County now are the "Sauratown Township" and "Sauratown Plantation Game Land".  All of these references probably refer to the Saura Indians who lived in that area at that time.   

Patrick MULLINS I did not sign any deeds after 1767.  Nor are there any further records found that refer to him.  I know about three of his boys; William and Flower, who fought in the Revolutionary War; Thomas who stayed next door in Rockingham County, where he bought some land from his brother, John MULLINS I, discussed next.  The other son Patrick II has not surfaced, nor any other sons of Patrick I.  Could one of them be our Bud?  Perhaps.  If Patrick I died before 1770, Bud would have been a minor.  If he was part of this family, how did he get about 60 direct miles away from the family home during the Revolutionary War?  That is a long way from your family at that time.  Therefore, it is necessary to look elsewhere for our elusive Bud and his parentage. 

Patrick Mullins I    John Mullins I    Thomas Mullins II    Bud Mullins

 
  1. Revolutionary War Pension Application File #R7483:  He also mentioned that Flower Mullins was his younger brother.  From his application, his birth year was estimated to be about 1745
  2. Revolutionary War Pension File #S1557
  3. Rockingham County, North Carolina, Will Book #1, pg. 28
  4. Lord Granville Index in the Land Grant Office of the Secretary of State, The North Carolina State Archives, Mullen, Patrick #13, 375 ac, Grant 160, 15 Mar, 1756, Book 12, pg. 2, Both sides of Haw River
  5. Refer to items #9 and #10 showing the record book changes from Rowan to Surry County and the numbers to letters

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